Stuart E. Rigold and official guidebooks

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1974 (1985)

Stuart Eborall Rigold (1919-1980) studied geology at St Andrews, and during WW2 worked at Bletchley Park. He continued his studies at St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he was recruited for the Ministry of Works (1948) working under Bryan O’Neil. He was Principal Inspector (1976-79).

Rigold wrote the following guidebooks:

It should be noted that several of these are sites in Kent: Maison Dieu; Temple Manor; Eynsford Castle; Reculver.

16 Comments

  1. […] Stuart Rigold (1919–80) joined the Ministry of Works as an Assistant Inspector of Ancient Monuments in 1948 under Bryan O’Neil. One of his first tasks was to write a short (paper) guidebook of the Pyx Chamber at Westminster Abbey and issued by the Ministry of Works (1949; 2 d.). It consists of four pages starting with the history, showing that this part of the abbey could be placed during the reign of King Edward the Confessor, followed by a description. Page 3 consists of a plan of the Pyx Chamber. […]

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  2. […] S.E. Rigold wrote the official guidebook (1958) consisting of a history and a description. There are a number of black and white images. G.C. Dunning added a section on the museum; there is a plan showing the layout of the display cases. Dunning includes a review of Roman finds in the area of Ospringe. He also includes a note on the Ospringe finds now in the British Museum. […]

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  3. […] Stuart E. Rigold wrote a short guide to the site in 1971. This followed the format of the DOE concertina card guides (see also Hardknott Roman fort). There are 6 columns of text (the fort, the minster) on one side (with a small plan of the fort and church), a series of images including a plan of the 7th-15th century ecclesiastical structures. […]

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  4. […] Stuart E. Rigold revised Peers’ text in a 3rd edition of the text (1965). This was divided into two main parts: a history and a description. The description included sections on the Roman fortress, the medieval castle, and the church (for an Augustinian priory). There are two fold-out plans inside the back cover: the Roman fort, and a plan of the medieval castle. […]

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