Smailholm Tower – more guides

As a follow-up to David’s post on Smailholm Tower, in my own collection I have a couple of publications to fill in some gaps. Historic Scotland had moved to producing colour covers for its guides during the mid-1980s during it’s latter years as part of the Scottish Development Department when greater commercial expectations were being made of the Historic Buildings & Monuments department, and the Historic Scotland brand was emerging.  (As an aside, the Scottish Development Department has it’s own interesting organisational history, explored in part by Ian Levitt in 1996 in a paper in Scottish Affairs).

The guide runs to 16 pages, comprising an Introduction, History, Tour, and Exhibition section on the costume figures collection which had been “presented by the Saltire Society to the Secretary of State for Scotland in 1983 for permanent display in Smailholm Tower.” [my italics]  This guide also carries the logo of Gateway supermarkets as a supporter and sponsor (advertising considered in a previous post). A price code is noted on the back cover, as opposed to a set cost which would limit the ability to change the selling price of the guide without a full reprint.

Chris Tabraham (Principal Inspector of Ancient Monuments, and author of a number of publications) is the author of the guide, first published in 1985, and in its second impression with amendments in 1989 (pictured). This version of the guide still forms the basis of another revision in 2007 into the modern Historic Scotland guidebook format considered in the previous post on Smailholm, but which still notes that it was first published by HMSO in 1985.

In 1993, Historic Scotland reprinted the Excavation Report for Smailholm which had been published in the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 118 (1988), authored by Chris Tabraham and George Good. This was sold at the site (very reasonably, in comparison to many excavation reports) as an additional option to the guidebook. Whilst focusing on archaeological investigations carried out between 1979 and 1981, the publication provides further historical and architectural context for the Tower.

 

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