Posts by David Gill

David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage and Director of Heritage Futures at the University of Suffolk.

Attic gold-figured silver plate from Thrace

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2015

I have been reading Athanasios Sideris, Theseus in Thrace: the silver lining on the clouds of the Athenian-Thracian relations in the 5th century BC (Sofia: Thrace Foundation, 2015). It includes some remarkable gold-figured silver plate from the Bojkov Collection as well as other collections in Bulgaria. The book supports my earlier research with Michael Vickers in Artful Crafts (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994).

Among the pieces that deserve to be more widely discussed:

a. Rheneia cup, Peleus hunting a stag

b. Rheneia cup, Theseus and the Marathon bull. Weight: 189.94 g. [45 dr]

c. Rheneia cup, Theseus and Skiron. Veliko Tarnovo, District History Museum, inv. 1728 P. Found in Kapinovo, near Veliko Tarnovo.

d. Kantharos, Thesus and Ariadne

e. Kantharos, Theus, Pirithous and Helen. Weight: 379.9 g.

f. Kantharos, infant Herakles with snakes. Wight: 282.4 g.

g. Phiale, Amazonomachy. Weight: 416 g.

Sideris then lists the corpus of Athenian silver plate including material from:

i. Semibratny

ii. Duvanli

iii. Chernozem, near Plovdiv

iv. Chmyreva tumulus.

v. Kapinovo

Other material in collections or on the market:

vi. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art inv. 2015.260.1–2.

vii. Phoenix Ancient Art.

 

 

 

Pendennis and St Mawes: guidebooks

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Pendennis Castle © David Gill

The castles at Pendennis and St Mawes were built to protect the Carrick Roads and Falmouth in Cornwall. Both appear to have been completed by 1543. They formed part of a wider network of coastal castles, including Deal and Walmer, and the Solent. For further details of the programme of defence see here.

Both castles were placed in State Guardianship in 1920 (from the War Office), and they were requisitioned for military purposes in the Second World War. They were re-opened to the public in 1946.

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1963 (5th impress. 1972)

A souvenir guide was produced in 1963, was continued into the 1970s under the Department of the Environment. This provides a guide to both castles as well as a historical introduction.

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1999 (repr. 2002)

English Heritage produced a colour guide to both castles in 1999 by Richard Linzey. It includes tours of both castles, as well as a page on the National Trust property of St Anthony Head Battery.

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2012 (2nd ed. 2018)

The latest guide by Paul Pattison has extended tours of both castles. There are special topics that include smuggling and piracy, the submarine minefield, as well as St Anthony Head. Foldout plans are printed inside the cover.

Stanton Drew: the Cove

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Stanton Drew, the Cove © David Gill

The Cove lies to the south-west of the main circle at Stanton Drew, and to the rear of the Druid’s Arms. Lindsell finds parallels at Avebury, Cairnpapple, and at Rollright. Burl notes that the stone is dolomitic breccia, and different to the other stones.

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Stanton Drew, the Cove © David Gill

The Tin Coast and Poldark

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The Crowns Engine Houses at Botallack © David Gill

The BBC Drama Series ‘Poldark‘ is set in Cornwall in what is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The ‘Tin Coast‘ includes the Crowns Engine Houses at Botallack in the care of the National Trust.

Heritage locations used in the filming of the series have been listed by Visit Cornwall.

Signs of Chysauster

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Chysauster © David Gill

A single Ministry signpost continues to point the way to Chysauster Ancient Village through the network of small roads in Penwith. It even provides the distance: 2 1/4 miles.

Traces of the original green paint can still be seen against the post.

Chysauster and Carn Euny: guidebooks

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Chysauster © David Gill

Two late Iron Age village communities in Penwith are in the care of English Heritage. Chysauster was paced in State Guardianship in 1931, and Carn Euny was purchased in 1957.

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1960 (1968)

The first paper guidebook was Chysauster was prepared by P.K. Baillie Reynolds in 1960. There is a short history (including recent investigations) followed by a house by house description. There is a plan on the centre pages.

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1971

The DOE produced a short card guide to the site in 1971. This provides a tour of the houses: “Ask the custodian to point out the path uphill to House 6 …”.

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1987

Patricia M.L. Christie, who excavated at Carn Euny, produced the English Heritage guide to Chysauster (1987). This has an introductory section on the site, history, the field system, dating, and environment and economy.  Most of the guide consists of a description and a tour of the houses. Christie also prepared a separate guide to Carn Euny (1983).

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1993

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1997, 2nd ed. (repr. 2000)

Christie’s two separate guides were combined in 1993, with a second edition, using colour images, in 1997; it continued to be printed in 2000.

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2017

English Heritage has now produced a combined guide by Susan Greaney (2017). This contains two separate tours of the villages, followed by a combined history. There are seven special features including the use of the sites by Methodist preachers, Plans of both sites appear inside the foldout back cover.