Posts by Ian Baxter

Director of Scottish Confucius Institute for Business & Communication, Heriot-Watt University & Professor of Historic Environment Management, UCS Ian Baxter originally trained as an archaeologist at Edinburgh University, and completed a PhD at the University of Cambridge investigating strategic management within heritage organisations. He has worked for a number of Universities, including the University of Cambridge (as Director of Public and Professional Programmes), and Glasgow Caledonian University (as Head of Department of Management and Director of Business School Postgraduate Programmes). Ian has spent over 20 years working and researching with a variety of heritage and tourism organisations throughout the UK. He was closely involved in the development of the national Heritage Counts programme by the Government’s conservation agency, English Heritage, which established the value and impact of the historic environment and heritage organisations to England (in terms of employment, visitors, quality of life, etc.). More recently he continued his involvement in heritage auditing through the development of the Scottish Government’s Historic Environment Audit programme with Historic Scotland, where he completed a mapping exercise of conservation and heritage-related organisations in Scotland. He has also managed a variety of tourism development consultancy projects, including the national visitor attractions survey with VisitScotland, and an assessment of organisational support needs for non-governmental and voluntary/charitable organisations in the Scottish historic environment sector. His research interests are policy development, methodologies for establishing historic environment and heritage ‘values’, heritage foresight / scenario planning and tourism/visitor attraction management. He is a member of a number of professional committees, including the ICOMOS-UK Cultural Tourism Committee (a UNESCO advisory committee) and has previously served on the National Trust for Scotland’s Archaeology and Economic & Community Development Advisory Panels and English Heritage’s Research Advisory Panel. He’s has edited the ‘Cultural Trends’ journal Policy Research Notes section (Routledge); the policy research information bulletin on behalf of the UK Heritage Research Group (UKHRG); and the new resources section for the US-based ‘Heritage & Society’ journal (Left Coast Press). He is a director of The Heritage Alliance, and the Built Environment Forum Scotland. Ian is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, a Practitioner of the Institute for Archaeologists, an Affiliate Member of the Institute of Historic Building Conservation and tweets about heritage and tourism.

Academic journals: International Journal of Architectural Heritage (Conservation, Analysis, Restoration)

Journal summary: IJAH provides a multidisciplinary scientific overview of existing resources and modern technologies useful for the study and repair of historical buildings and other structures. The journal will include information on history, methodology, materials, survey, inspection, non-destructive testing, analysis, diagnosis, remedial measures, and strengthening techniques.
Preservation of the architectural heritage is considered a fundamental issue in the life of modern societies. In addition to their historical interest, cultural heritage buildings are valuable because they contribute significantly to the economy by providing key attractions in a context where tourism and leisure are major industries in the 3rd millennium. The need of preserving historical constructions is thus not only a cultural requirement, but also an economical and developmental demand.
The study of historical buildings and other structures must be undertaken from an approach based on the use of modern technologies and science. The final aim must be to select and adequately manage the possible technical means needed to attain the required understanding of the morphology and the structural behavior of the construction and to characterize its repair needs. Modern requirements for an intervention include reversibility, unobtrusiveness, minimum repair, and respect of the original construction, as well as the obvious functional and structural requirements. Restoration operations complying with these principles require a scientific, multidisciplinary approach that comprehends historical understanding, modern non-destructive inspection techniques, and advanced experimental and computer methods of analysis.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/uarc20/current

Access: Subscription

Journal type: Peer-reviewed; some open-access

Academic journals: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers – Urban Design and Planning

Journal summary: Urban Design and Planning publishes refereed papers and short articles addressing the design and planning of the built environment, emphasizing the interfaces between urban policy, design, construction and management.
Topics covered by the journal include social, economic and environmental aspects of topics such as sustainable settlements, community regeneration, urban infrastructure and transport systems.

Publisher: Institute of Civil Engineers (ICE) Publishing

Website: https://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/journal/jurdp

Access: Subscription; some open-access

Journal type: Academic & professional peer-reviewed

From transit to tapas and trinkets

Coal Drops Yard has now opened behind King’s Cross Station, London. Whilst snagging jobs are still being completed, and with retail units still to fill, the site remains a work in progress in a rebirth that has seen the area’s legacy of historic buildings change from hosting goods yards and activities associated with the railways and canals, to retail and catering outlets at the ‘craft’ and ‘high end’ of the commercial spectrum. New architectural interventions have been added, such as the striking new roof over the west side of the coal yard, and in fully redundant plots brownfield redevelopment is seeing new office and retail blocks with strong design signatures distinctly of their time. Residential blocks combine old and new forms, including the striking Gas Holder blocks of flats.

Following the successful heritage-led redevelopments previously of the main King’s Cross and St. Pancras Stations, the whole area is now a fascinating amalgam of old and new, and epitomises our shifting relationship with places of transit which now tempt us to dwell longer rather than pass through.

Academic journals: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) – Engineering History and Heritage

Journal Summary: Engineering History and Heritage publishes papers concerning existing infrastructure, buildings and civil engineering structures around the world, and issues related to their conservation, restoration and adaptation to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

Publisher: Institute of Civil Engineers (ICE) Publishing

Website: https://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/journal/jenhh

Access: Subscription; some open-access

Journal type: Academic and professional peer-reviewed

Academic journals: AMPS (Architecture, Media, Politics, Society)

Journal summary: AMPS (Architecture, Media, Politics, Society) is an international nonprofit research organisation. AMPS sees the definition, debates and concerns of the built environment as intrinsic to those at the heart of other social, cultural and political discourses. The territory it seeks to explore is an overlaid terrain in which the physical, material and the environmental are critically examined through the prism of the cultural, the mediatic, the social and the political.
Its focus is cross disciplinary and draws on the media, politics and the social sciences. It invites participation from all sectors: architects, planners, policy makers, artists, academics, the public and community activists. It functions as an open access platform for publication, a forum for debate through conferences and workshop, a conduit for book publications and also operates as an academic resource repository. Run by information professionals, the repository offers up-to-date materials and listings for research.
Its social aims can be defined as: promoting an understanding of the role of architecture and the built environment on communities, public health and society more broadly; engaging all its stakeholders in events and debates aimed at better understanding and communicating the needs of each party; and providing openly accessible materials such as written articles, research guides, current event listings, and a database of organisations that support these aims.

Publisher: UCL Press

Website: http://architecturemps.com/

Access: Open-access

Journal type: Academic peer-reviewed

Free but not easy: raising money for the twilight portfolio of English Heritage sites in care

English Heritage has just launched The Once & Future Fund designed to build an endowment to support specifically the sites looked after by the organisation that don’t have admission charges, shops, cafes or custodians.  This group of free to access sites form the vast majority of the national portfolios of English Heritage (as well as Historic Scotland and Cadw), and therefore tend to be less in the public eye for recognition and visitation. The sites which vary in size from the very small (such as Dunster Butter Cross), through to the very large (like Maiden Castle) are theoretically no less important, though they do, unsurprisingly, fall much further down the pecking order when it comes to investment and maintenance.

The campaign by English Heritage is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, through its Heritage Endowments programme, with a HLF commitment to match fund donations up to £1 million. It will dedicate much needed funds and attention on this twilight group of sites which has never received the investment it should have, has never been made the most of within the broader national portfolio, and remains hugely under-interpreted for the visitor. Whilst the dedicated attention and matching commitment by the HLF is to be applauded, it does raise further broader questions about the original £88.5 million ‘endowment’ given to English Heritage / Historic England by Government as part of the English Heritage New Model organisational structure change, particularly around the state of play of reducing the long term conservation backlog for the unstaffed sites with complex needs, and the long-term viability of this part of the national collection which will have to increasingly rely on such fund-raising schemes.

Academic journals: Hospitality & Society

Journal summary: Hospitality & Society is published in partnership with the Council for Hospitality Management Education. Hospitality & Society is an international multidisciplinary social sciences journal focusing upon hospitality and exploring its connections with wider social and cultural processes and structures. The journal welcomes submissions from various disciplines and aims to be an interactive forum expanding frontiers of knowledge and contributing to the literature on hospitality social science. Articles that stimulate debate, discussion and exchange across disciplines are welcomed, as well as review essays or short topical pieces that are provocative and problematic in nature.

Publisher: Intellect

Website: https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=194

Access: Subscription; some open-access articles / editions

Journal type: Academic peer-reviewed