Warkworth Hermitage: landing sign

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Warkworth Hermitage © David Gill

There is limited access to the Hermitage near Warkworth in Northumberland. A rowing boat, crewed by a member of staff from English Heritage, takes you across the river. An official sign reminds you that only official boats are allowed to moor.

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Warkworth Hermitage © David Gill

Grimes Graves: DOE Guide

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1984

I have noted before the Young People’s Guide to Grime’s Graves by Barbara Green (MPBW, 1964). This was adapted in 1984 by the Department of the Environment with a rather striking cover (designed by William Brouard). Note that Grime’s Graves has now become Grimes Graves, and the young people’s guide has been dropped.

Additions include a map inside the front cover along with a revised version of ‘how to get there’. The Alan Sorrell reconstructions have also been dropped. The plan of Pit no. 1 has been re-orientated so that north is at the top. The general plan of the site shows that the custodian’s hut was moved from the site of the car-park to a point closer to Pit 1.

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Professional journals (archived): Conservation Bulletin

Journal summary: Conservation Bulletin was formerly published twice a year by Historic England (& prior to 2015 English Heritage) and circulated free of charge to more than 5,000 conservation specialists, opinion-formers and decision-makers. Its purpose was to communicate new ideas and advice to everyone concerned with the understanding, management and public enjoyment of England’s rich and diverse historic environment. 75 editions were produced between 1987 and 2016. The publication has been replaced by the corporate Heritage Calling blog https://heritagecalling.com/ and by a series of online Heritage Debates https://www.historicengland.org.uk/whats-new/debate/

Publisher: Historic England (formerly English Heritage)

Website: https://historicengland.org.uk/sitesearch?terms=conservation%20bulletin&type=Publication&pageSize=undefined&searchtype=sitesearch

Access: Open-access

Journal type: Professional journal (archived and no longer in production)

The Abbey of St Edmund: award

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The gatehouse to the Abbey, Bury St Edmunds © David Gill

The Abbey of St Edmund Heritage Partnership has received £9,900 from the HLF to develop its interpretation of the abbey precinct (“Abbey of St Edmund project gains National Lottery backing“, St Edmundsbury Borough Council, Press Release, 8 June 2018).

It states:

The money from the Heritage Lottery Fund will help prepare for the work that will take place after those studies are completed, by enabling the Heritage Partnership to develop organisational capacity and establish an independent not-for-profit organisation. It will also be used to procure management consultancy, skills training and IT equipment and to enable lessons to be learned from the success of another project at a former Benedictine Abbey elsewhere in the country.

That in turn will mean that it will be better positioned to raise funds in the future while also developing the capacity required to deliver on major heritage and education projects.

The Partnership:

The Abbey of St Edmund Heritage Partnership is led by St Edmundsbury Cathedral in collaboration with St Edmundsbury Borough Council and representatives of Suffolk County Council, Historic England, English Heritage, the University of East Anglia, the University of Suffolk, the Bury Society and several local community groups as well as specialist architects, historians and archaeologists.

New Abbey Corn Mill: advice for visitors

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New Abbey Corn Mill © David Gill

New Abbey Corn Mill is in the care of Historic Environment Scotland. It contains a number of ‘Ministry’ style signs reminding the public to take care in this complex structure.

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New Abbey Corn Mill © David Gill

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New Abbey Corn Mill © David Gill

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New Abbey Corn Mill © David Gill

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New Abbey Corn Mill © David Gill

New Excavations at Sutton Hoo

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Sutton Hoo excavations, June 2018 © David Gill

Some investigatory excavations were taking place at National Trust Sutton Hoo this last week in preparation for the construction of a viewing tower adjacent to the mound where the ship burial was excavation. This HLF funded project will enhance the public experience of what is one of the most important archaeological sites in Suffolk.

Archaeologists from MOLA have been investigating a Bronze Age ditch feature (with some contextualised pottery).

In 2015 a temporary scaffolding tower was erected to see how it changed the way that the public viewed the mounds.

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Sutton Hoo excavations, June 2018 © David Gill

Glenluce Abbey: welcome signs

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Glenluce Abbey © David Gill

The Cistcercian abbey at Glenluce was founded around 1192. Other abbeys were located at Melrose (1136), Dundrennan (1142) and Sweetheart (1273). Glenluce was placed in State Guardianship in 1933.

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Glenluce Abbey © David Gill