Lockdown Impact: The Globe

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The Globe Theatre © David Gill

The Globe theatre on the south bank of the Thames is the latest organisation to admit that it is “critically vulnerable and at risk of closure in the wake of Covid-19” (“Shakespeare’s Globe theatre calls for urgent funds to avoid insolvency“, BBC News 18 May 2020). The theatre is not apparently eligible for funding from Arts Council England. Yet organisations like this will be well-placed to attract tourists to London in the post-CV19 world.

Top 10 Heritage Sites for Wiltshire

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Avebury © David Gill

This is a personal list of heritage sites for Wiltshire.

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Avebury © David Gill

Avebury. This must be one of the most impressive prehistoric sites in England. The village of Avebury sits within the Henge. The monument is placed in the middle of a rich archaeological landscape.

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Silbury Hill © David Gill

Silbury Hill. This artificial hill dominates the land around it and forms part of the Avebury landscape.

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Stonehenge © David Gill

Stonehenge. This must be one of the most iconic prehistoric sites in England with the trilithons.

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Old Sarum © David Gill

Old Sarum. The foundations of the original cathedral and the medieval castle sit within an Iron Age hillfort.

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Salisbury Cathedral © David Gill

Salisbury Cathedral. The cathedral dominates the city of Salisbury. The foundation stone was laid in 1220 and it was consecrated in 1258.

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Bemerton © David Gill

Bemerton. The exquisite Bemerton church has associations with the poet George Herbert.

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Wilton House © David Gill

Wilton House. This is one of the most impressive houses in Wiltshire granted to the Pembrokes in 1544.

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Lacock Abbey © David Gill

Lacock Abbey. Parts of the former nunnery can be seen within the later house. Lacock is important for the birth of modern photography (in 1835).

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Bowood © David Gill

Bowood. The orangery (part of the 1768 south front) and the grounds hint at the grandeur of this estate. The main house was destroyed by fire in 1955.

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Stourhead © David Gill

Stourhead. This is one of the top landscapes gardens in Britain. It was originally laid out between 1722 and 1787. Among the buildings is Henry Flitcroft’s Pantheon (1753).

 

Guidebooks by P.K. Baillie Reynolds

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1951 (2012 reprint)

Paul Kenneth Baillie Reynolds (1896–1973) wrote a number of guidebooks for monuments in state guardianship.

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1956 (repr. 1970)

Baillie Reynolds was educated a Winchester College, and Hertford College, Oxford. His studies were interrupted by service in the Royal Field Artillery (1915–19) when he served in the 4th West Riding (Howitzer) Brigade. On completion of his studies he became a Pelham Student at the British School at Rome (1921–23). He published Thomas Ashby’s notes on the Castra Peregrinorum as well as a study of the troops based there in the Journal of Roman Studies (1923). In 1923 he was made an award by the Craven Fund to continue his research at the British School at Rome; the other awards were made to William A. Heurtley of Oriel College, and C.A. Ralegh Radford of Exeter College.

In 1924 he was appointed Assistant Master, Winchester College, and later the same year Lecturer in Ancient History, University College of Wales, Aberystwyth (1924–34) where the principal from 1927 to 1934 was (Sir) Henry Stuart-Jones, a former director of the British School at Rome. Baillie Reynolds published The Vigiles of Imperial Rome (Oxford University Press, 1926). From 1926–29 he directed the excavation of the Roman auxiliary fort at Caerhun (Canovium) to the south of Conwy in north Wales; the final report was published by him in 1938. In 1931 he was responsible for excavating the north gate, and in 1932 the west gate of Verulamium as part of the wider project directed by (Sir) Mortimer and Tessa Wheeler. He was elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (1929).

In 1934 he was appointed Inspector of Ancient Monuments for England, Ministry of Works. In 1936 in his capacity as Inspector he supported the proposal to preserve the remains of the Jewry Wall in Leicester that had been excavated by Kathleen Kenyon. In 1935 he was elected to the Council for the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, serving alongside Ralegh Radford.  In 1947 he was one of the people who helped to acquire the Roman site of Wall from the National Trust.

Baillie Reynolds joined the Royal Field Artillery (TA) (1927–39) while he was in Aberystwyth, and during the Second World War served as a Major in the Royal Artillery (1939–45).

In 1954 he became Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments, Ministry of Works (1954–1961) replacing B.H. St John O’Neil; A.J. Taylor was appointed Assistant Chief Inspector. One of his projects was the intervention at Corfe Castle in 1959 to stabilise the ruins. Another was the restoration of West Kennet Long Barrow and Wayland’s Smithy; he defended his decisions in The Daily Telegraph (28 July 1962) describing the work as ‘no more a “fake” than is the reconstructed Portland Vase’. In 1960 he advised on the restoration of the Claudian aqueduct that ran through the grounds of the British Embassy in Rome. He retired in 1961 and was succeeded by Taylor.

In 1963 he was elected President, Royal Archaeological Institute (1963–1966) succeeding Ralegh Radford. He was made OBE (1950) and CBE (1957). Baillie Reynolds died in 1973.

Obituary: The Times 25 August 1973.

Melrose Abbey: danger sign

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

This is a variant of the more usual, ‘Danger. Do not climb on the walls’ sign (e.g. Bury St Edmunds Abbey; Hadleigh Castle; Kirkham Priory; Lindisfarne Priory; Pickering Castle; Warkworth Castle). Lindsifarne also has, ‘Danger. Do not climb’.

Melrose Abbey: east processional doorway

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Access between the great cloister and the abbey church was by a processional doorway on the north side of the church. It was situated adjacent to the monks’ quire.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill
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Melrose Abbey © David Gill
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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The joist holes supported the roof covering the walkways round the cloister.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill
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Melrose Abbey © David Gill
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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Hadrian’s Wall: Benwell Vallum Crossing

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Benwell © David Gill

The vallum crossing lay 55 m from the south gateway of the cavalry fort at Benwell (Condercum). The crossing has a monumental gateway, 3.56 m wide, which was controlled from the north.

The vallum crossing is in the care of English Heritage (with links to plan).

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Benwell © David Gill

Heritage Shut-Down

Visitors

Heritage site across the UK are closed as part of the general shut-down due to COVID. This will, in itself, cause financial issues for those bodies that rely on income to maintain, conserve and protect sites.

The Heritage Alliance has issued some advice to heritage organisations during the present crisis.

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Saxtead Green Post Mill © David Gill