#HeritageDay17 Glenfinnan

IMG_2927

Glenfinnan © David Gill

The Glenfinnan Monument, in the care of the National Trust for Scotland, marks the point where Prince Charles Edward Stewart landed in 1745. The column was erected in 1815

IMG_2919

Glenfinnan © David Gill

Releasing the Story of Sutton Hoo

IMG_6804

Sutton Hoo © David Gill

The National Trust has been awarded £1.8 million by the Heritage Lottery Fund to enhance the visitor experience at Sutton Hoo. One of the projects will be to create a 17 m high viewing tower to give some visitors views of the burial ground. Tranmer House, overlooking the cemetery, will be the home for a new interpretative exhibition.

Framlingham Castle: the towers

IMG_7862

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9703

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

The gateway to Framlingham Castle enters through the base of Tower 1.

IMG_7865

Framlingham Castle, Towers 1-6 (from right to left) © David Gill

IMG_7863

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9728

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7864

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

On the eastern side are Towers 4, 5, and 6.

IMG_7873

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9706

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7874

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_0271

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9710

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9723

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7870

Framlingham Castle, Towers 7-11 (from right to left) © David Gill

IMG_7875

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9719

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7877

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9713

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9718

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9717

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

The present descent from the wall walkway is through Tower 10.

IMG_7872

Framlingham Castle, Towers 9-13 (from right to left) © David Gill

IMG_0529

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

Access to the wall walkway is through Tower 11.

IMG_7876

Framlingham Castle, Towers 1, 13 and 12 (from left to right) © David Gill

IMG_9693

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9730

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

Framlingham Castle: Tudor bridge

IMG_0571

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

A 16th century bridge provided access from the inner court to the garden on the other side of the ditch in the outer bailey. The bridge was constructed from stone and brick.

Access was adjacent to Tower 7.

IMG_0566

Framlingham Castle, Tudor bridge © David Gill

Melrose Abbey: Dorter

IMG_2059

Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The dorter lay on the east side of the cloister, above the chapter house. The night stairs to it were in the north transept of the abbey church. The dorter was accessed through a round doorway.

IMG_2060-Edit copy

Melrose Abbey, doorway to dorter © David Gill

IMG_2070-Edit

Melrose Abbey, east range with doorway to night stairs © David Gill

The day stairs to the dorter lay in the north-east corner of the cloister, on the south side of the dorter. Note the roof line of the dorter on the exterior of the north transept of the church.

IMG_2071

Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The reredorter lay on the east side of the dorter.

IMG_2068-Edit

Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Brougham Castle: Latin Inscription

IMG_9847

Latin inscription, Brougham Castle © David Gill

The 13th century keep of Brougham Castle, Cumbria incorporates reused masonry from the Roman fort (Brocavum). A Latin funerary inscription is built into the ceiling of the second floor (RIB 787). The person named is Tittus M[..] who died around the age of 32 (‘[pl]us minus’). The monument was set up by his brother.

The Antonine Wall: Legio XX

P1100130

Cast of inscription from Hutcheson Hill, now in Chesters Museum © David Gill

In 1865 a Latin inscription (RIB 2198) was recovered at Hutcheson Hill in the western section of the Antonine Wall. Casts were made and the original was taken to the Chicago Museum where it was destroyed in the great fire of October 1871. [See also Canmore]

The inscription records a vexillatio of the 20th Legion Valeria Victrix that had constructed 3000 feet of the wall.

Another inscription, now in the Hunterian Museum, was found in 1969 near Hutcheson Hill and similarly records a vexillatio of the same legion that had constructed 3000 feet of the wall (AE 1971, no.225) [JSTOR].

A third inscription of the Twentieth Legion probably comes from near Duntocher (RIB 2199).

vexillatio of the Sixth Legion Victrix Pia Fidelis was found at Duntocher (RIB 2200). This stretch was 3240 feet.