An Inventory for Scotland

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2015

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) presented its final reports in the form of a well illustrated overview of its work from 1908 until its conclusion in 2015. This beautifully designed study includes commentary on the impact of different technologies on how the historic landscape and its features can be mapped and recorded.

Tattershall Castle

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Tattershall Castle © David Gill

Tattershall Castle in Lincolnshire is in the care of the National Trust. The present brick tower was constructed by Ralph Cromwell, Third Baron Cromwell, in 1434; it was completed in 1446. It has six levels, and from the very top there are clear views over Lincolnshire.

The castle was purchased by Lord Curzon of Kedleston, the former viceroy of India, in 1911 and subsequently given to the National Trust. The castle had faced demolition and the removal of its architectural features for export to the USA after it had been sold in 1910; the case had been a spur to (Sir) Charles Peers in his preparion of the Ancient Monuments Act (1913).

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View from Tattershall Castle © David Gill

Plans to merge Cadw and National Museums Wales

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Opening of National Waterfront Museum, Swansea, 17 October 2005 © David Gill

There has been speculation for some time about the possible merger of Cadw and National Museums Wales (Amgueddfa Cymru). It has been reported today that Dr David Fleming, Director of the National Museums Liverpool, has written to the Welsh Government Culture, Welsh Language and Communications Committee  (“‘Threat’ to National Museum Wales over merger plans“, BBC News 7 October 2016). He wrote: “I cannot stress enough the pivotal role that Wales’ national museum service plays in the demonstration of Welsh nationality and the damage that could result from any diminution of that role.”

The merger is likely to include the National Library of Wales (Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru).

One of the proposed names for the new body is apparently “Historic Wales”.

The Economy Secretary for Welsh Government, Ken Skates, stated: “This [evolution] is essential if these organisations are to continue to act as effective custodians of our outstanding historic collections and heritage and provide an outstanding visitor experience.”

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Carew Cross © David Gill

Suffolk’s Coastal Heritage Matters

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Landguard Fort © David Gill

The DCMS Coastal Heritage awards attracted £172,900 for five projects in Suffolk: Landguard, Ipswich Waterfront, Bawdsey, and two for Lowestoft. These awards recognise the importance of Suffolk’s coastal heritage.

Reflecting on the RSA’s #HeritageIndex

RSA heritage index 2015 coverThe RSA has recently launched the first iteration of the Heritage Index in association with the Heritage Lottery Fund.  For the first time it has brought together a disparate range of data outputs which can be categorised according to whether they are heritage assets or heritage activities.  Correlations are then made between them, with factoring for density of activity / asset, population, and weighting according to the perceived importance of the the category type.  The methodology is explored within a short film, accompanying technical report, and data which can be explored through manipulation of the summary dataset in an excel file, or via the web-based visualisations which make good use of spatial data presentation techniques.

This forms part of a larger project which the RSA is working on, looking at the opportunities and challenges for ‘place development’ – of importance in a political and public services landscape of regionalisation and localism and expectation of ever greater value for money for public investment.  The historic environment (to give heritage it’s policy-world moniker) is under pressure, and is regularly flagged as being under-resourced and at risk, so the Heritage Index data is a useful tool in terms of reanalysing and reconceptualising the role of heritage assets within our living environment.  The work has thrown up some interesting initial findings – which at first may seem counter-intuitive, but perhaps when reflected upon, were staring us in the face.  Areas with high levels of heritage assets don’t always have high levels of engagement with those assets, and areas suffering from deprivation with low density of heritage assets to access may actually have higher levels of engagement.  There is of course variability across the country and the methodology can be pored over for what it does and doesn’t do – but nonetheless, it does show the potential for arguments of what heritage can potentially do within communities.

The Index also brings to the fore the use of proxy measures – useful at a time when in Scotland, discussion has come round again on whether the Scotland Performs framework indicator for heritage – the state of Category A Listed Buildings at Risk (equivalent to Grade I in England) – is suitable to act as a measure of the state of the historic environment.  Proxy measures are liked and disliked in equal measure, and care must be taken with them – but it does not mean that they cannot raise interesting analytical results and dialogue – as has happened with the Index.

The publication and commitment to continue to support the development and evolution of the Index is welcome, and I’ll take this opportunity to sound like a broken record (stuck in the same groove for over a decade, since I assisted with the creation of Heritage Counts as an evolution from the Heritage Monitor produced by the English Tourism Council (now VisitEngland)), flagging the need for a heritage observatory function to pull together the large amounts of data and grey literature which can add to the evidence base for the role of the historic environment in society.

A debate was held at the RSA last week, entitled ‘Why heritage is our future‘ to explore issues associated with the Index, and enable commentary on the links between communities and their historic environment.  What was noticeable throughout the debate, which was lively and interesting, was the lack of consideration of heritage organisations themselves (apart from the HLF which was represented at the debate by the Head of Research and Evaluation, Gareth Maeer).  This was surprising to me – having spent much of my professional life working with the inner machinery of conservation agencies, heritage NGOs and policy analysis. Perhaps these organisations aren’t as visible or at the front of the mind of people engaging with heritage as much as we think within community settings?  This is something I need to explore further.

Link to audio recording of the RSA debate on 8th October 2015.
https://www.thersa.org/link/bc55acf32c5e4c4191898263b18778fb.aspx
Storify feed of #heritageindex tweets

Suffolk Heritage Strategy

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The Suffolk Heritage Strategy has been developed ‘to preserve, protect and enhance Suffolk’s heritage for the enjoyment of future generations whilst maximising its impact and celebrating its wider contributions to education, economic development, health and well-being, helping to create a strong sense of place, pride and belonging’.

It contains three priorities:

  1. Identity, Economy, and Tourism
  2. Community Engagement and Learning
  3. Heritage Protection and Enhancement

Professors Baxter and Gill contributed to the strategy through the Strategic Heritage Forum.

The full document can be found here.

Scotland’s new Archaeology Strategy

A brand new 10 year Archaeology Strategy for Scotland was launched at Europe’s biggest archaeology conference in Glasgow today (European Archaeological Association).
Scotland's Archaeology Strategy

Scotland’s Archaeology Strategy

Scotland’s Archaeology Strategy has been developed by the Scottish Strategic Archaeology Committee, coordinated by Historic Scotland, with input from over 200 people from across the archaeology sector in Scotland and beyond. It sets out a shared national vision that Scotland’s archaeology should benefit everyone in society.

It complements work that has been undertaken over the past few years by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, as part of the ScARF (Scotland’s Archaeological Research Framework), and puts in place a framework for the new national heritage organisation, Historic Environment Scotland, to support archaeology as an integral part of our lived and natural environment.