Pevensey Castle: guidebooks

Pevensey_green

1952 (repr. 1956)

Sir Charles Peers prepared the post-war guidebook to Pevensey Castle in 1952. The monument incorporates part of the Roman Saxon Shore fort. The guidebook contains a history followed by a description. A foldout plan is placed inside the back cover. A number of black and white photographs are included.

Pevensey_blue

1952 (rev. with additions 1963)

Peers’ guide continued to be published through the 1960s. The pictures were placed as a block rather than slotted through the text.

Pevensey_DOE

1970

A souvenir guide was prepared by Derek F. Renn in 1970. He had previously prepared a similar souvenir guide for three shell keeps in the west country. Renn later wrote the official guidebooks to a number of sites in England and Wales.

Pevensey_EH

1999 (rev. 2011)

The English Heritage guidebook is prepared by John Goodall. This starts with a tour and description, and then a section on the history. There is a special section on the Second World War defences. A colour plan is provided inside the back cover.

Cambuskenneth Abbey: guidebook

Cambuskenneth_AMHB

1950 (repr. 1973)

Cambuskenneth Abbey, near Stirling, was founded in 1147.

The remains of the abbey were placed in State Guardianship in 1908. Stewart Cruden prepared the first guidebook in 1950; a second edition appeared in 1978. It consists of two parts: history and description. A plan is placed on the centre pages.

Arbroath Abbey: guidebook

Arbroath_blue

1954 (4th impress. 1972)

Arbroath Abbey was founded by William the Lion in 1178 in memory of Thomas Becket of Canterbury. Tironensian monks from Kelso helped to establish the community. The abbey was the setting for the Declaration of Arbroath on 5 April 1320.

The official guide is divided into two sections: a history by R.L. Mackie; and a description by Stewart Cruden. A conjectural reconstruction is placed in the centre, and a fold-out plan inside the back cover.

 

Tintern Abbey: guidebooks

Tintern_DG_6

Tintern Abbey © David Gill

Tintern Abbey was transferred to the Office of Works in 1914. The guidebook was prepared by the architect Sir Harold Brakspear (1934). Brakspear had helped to plan the ruins after they were purchased by the Crown in 1901, and before they were conserved.

Tintern_MPBW_blue

1956 (repr. 1968)

A replacement ‘blue guide’ was prepared by O.E. Craster in 1956. This took the standard pattern of history followed by description. A plan of the abbey was placed in the centre pages.

Tintern_DOE_blue

1956 (9th impress. 1977)

Craster’s guide continued to be published into the 1970s. This included some elements in Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn (on the title page, but not on the cover), and a short summary of just over one page at the beginning.

The centre page plan was placed on a fold-out plan inside the back cover. The glossary was expanded to include: ashlar, barrel vault, conversi, garth, jamb, lay brother, lintel, mullion, novice, papal bull, plinth, pulpitum, quire, refectory, screen, vestment and vestry. It also dropped: aisle, bay, boss, capital, crossing, floriated, sexfoil.

Tintern_souvenir_cov

1960; 1964, 2nd ed.; 1967, 3rd impress.

Craster also prepared the illustrated souvenir guide (1960; 2nd ed. 1964). It included historical background; a tour of the abbey; the first tourists. The tour is numbered on the plan.

Tintern_Cadw_card

1985

The tour in the souvenir guide in effect turns into the card guide that continued to be published under Cadw.

Tintern_Cadw

1986; 2nd ed. 1990; 3rd ed. 1995; 4th ed. 2002

The Cadw guidebook was prepared by David M. Robinson. This includes a history of the abbey, a section on building the abbey, and a tour of the abbey. A foldout plan (in colour) is printed inside the back (card) cover.

Old Soar Manor: guidebook

OldSoar_MPBW

1950 (repr. 1968)

Old Soar Manor in Kent was acquired by the National Trust (1947) and subsequently placed in State Guardianship (1948). Margaret Wood prepared the paper guidebook in 1950 and it continued in print until the 1970s. The guide has a short history and a longer description. A floor plan of the house in c. 1290 is included.

Note the entry: ‘A National Trust property in the guardianship of the Ministry of Public Buildings and Works’.

Stirling Castle: guidebooks

Stirling_blue

Second edition 1948, 7th impression 1967

Stirling_blue_HMSO

2nd ed. 1948 (8th impress. 1972)

The first edition of the guide to Stirling Castle was published in 1936: the description by J.S. Richardson, and the history by Margaret E. Root. A second edition appeared in 1948, and it continued as a ‘blue guide’ into the 1970s (note the move from guide-book to guide).

A fold-out plan was placed inside the back cover.

The cover of the Richardson and Root guide is ‘a drawing of a portrait medallion representing James V, one of a set of wood panels originally in the ceiling of the King’s Presence Chamber’. The heads were the subject of a monograph published by the Royal Commission in 1960. A booklet was issued by the Royal Commission in 1975, with the text by John G. Dunbar.

Stirling_heads_RC

1975

The Historic Scotland guide by Richard Fawcett was published in 1999. This consisted of a guide tour followed by the story (not history) of the castle.

Stirling_HS

1999 (repr. 2002)

Attic gold-figured silver plate from Thrace

2019-07-17-0001

2015

I have been reading Athanasios Sideris, Theseus in Thrace: the silver lining on the clouds of the Athenian-Thracian relations in the 5th century BC (Sofia: Thrace Foundation, 2015). It includes some remarkable gold-figured silver plate from the Bojkov Collection as well as other collections in Bulgaria. The book supports my earlier research with Michael Vickers in Artful Crafts (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994).

Among the pieces that deserve to be more widely discussed:

a. Rheneia cup, Peleus hunting a stag

b. Rheneia cup, Theseus and the Marathon bull. Weight: 189.94 g. [45 dr]

c. Rheneia cup, Theseus and Skiron. Veliko Tarnovo, District History Museum, inv. 1728 P. Found in Kapinovo, near Veliko Tarnovo.

d. Kantharos, Thesus and Ariadne

e. Kantharos, Theus, Pirithous and Helen. Weight: 379.9 g.

f. Kantharos, infant Herakles with snakes. Wight: 282.4 g.

g. Phiale, Amazonomachy. Weight: 416 g.

Sideris then lists the corpus of Athenian silver plate including material from:

i. Semibratny

ii. Duvanli

iii. Chernozem, near Plovdiv

iv. Chmyreva tumulus.

v. Kapinovo

Other material in collections or on the market:

vi. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art inv. 2015.260.1–2.

vii. Phoenix Ancient Art.