Attic gold-figured silver plate from Thrace

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2015

I have been reading Athanasios Sideris, Theseus in Thrace: the silver lining on the clouds of the Athenian-Thracian relations in the 5th century BC (Sofia: Thrace Foundation, 2015). It includes some remarkable gold-figured silver plate from the Bojkov Collection as well as other collections in Bulgaria. The book supports my earlier research with Michael Vickers in Artful Crafts (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994).

Among the pieces that deserve to be more widely discussed:

a. Rheneia cup, Peleus hunting a stag

b. Rheneia cup, Theseus and the Marathon bull. Weight: 189.94 g. [45 dr]

c. Rheneia cup, Theseus and Skiron. Veliko Tarnovo, District History Museum, inv. 1728 P. Found in Kapinovo, near Veliko Tarnovo.

d. Kantharos, Thesus and Ariadne

e. Kantharos, Theus, Pirithous and Helen. Weight: 379.9 g.

f. Kantharos, infant Herakles with snakes. Wight: 282.4 g.

g. Phiale, Amazonomachy. Weight: 416 g.

Sideris then lists the corpus of Athenian silver plate including material from:

i. Semibratny

ii. Duvanli

iii. Chernozem, near Plovdiv

iv. Chmyreva tumulus.

v. Kapinovo

Other material in collections or on the market:

vi. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art inv. 2015.260.1–2.

vii. Phoenix Ancient Art.

 

 

 

Pendennis and St Mawes: guidebooks

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Pendennis Castle © David Gill

The castles at Pendennis and St Mawes were built to protect the Carrick Roads and Falmouth in Cornwall. Both appear to have been completed by 1543. They formed part of a wider network of coastal castles, including Deal and Walmer, and the Solent. For further details of the programme of defence see here.

Both castles were placed in State Guardianship in 1920 (from the War Office), and they were requisitioned for military purposes in the Second World War. They were re-opened to the public in 1946.

Pendennis_DOE

1963 (5th impress. 1972)

A souvenir guide was produced in 1963, was continued into the 1970s under the Department of the Environment. This provides a guide to both castles as well as a historical introduction.

Pendennis_StM_EH

1999 (repr. 2002)

English Heritage produced a colour guide to both castles in 1999 by Richard Linzey. It includes tours of both castles, as well as a page on the National Trust property of St Anthony Head Battery.

Pendennis_StM_EH_red

2012 (2nd ed. 2018)

The latest guide by Paul Pattison has extended tours of both castles. There are special topics that include smuggling and piracy, the submarine minefield, as well as St Anthony Head. Foldout plans are printed inside the cover.

Chysauster and Carn Euny: guidebooks

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Chysauster © David Gill

Two late Iron Age village communities in Penwith are in the care of English Heritage. Chysauster was paced in State Guardianship in 1931, and Carn Euny was purchased in 1957.

Chysauster_MPBW

1960 (1968)

The first paper guidebook was Chysauster was prepared by P.K. Baillie Reynolds in 1960. There is a short history (including recent investigations) followed by a house by house description. There is a plan on the centre pages.

Chysauster_DOE

1971

The DOE produced a short card guide to the site in 1971. This provides a tour of the houses: “Ask the custodian to point out the path uphill to House 6 …”.

Chysauster_EH_white

1987

Patricia M.L. Christie, who excavated at Carn Euny, produced the English Heritage guide to Chysauster (1987). This has an introductory section on the site, history, the field system, dating, and environment and economy.  Most of the guide consists of a description and a tour of the houses. Christie also prepared a separate guide to Carn Euny (1983).

Chysauster_CE_EH_1993

1993

Chysauster_CE_EH_2000

1997, 2nd ed. (repr. 2000)

Christie’s two separate guides were combined in 1993, with a second edition, using colour images, in 1997; it continued to be printed in 2000.

Chysauster_CE_EH_red

2017

English Heritage has now produced a combined guide by Susan Greaney (2017). This contains two separate tours of the villages, followed by a combined history. There are seven special features including the use of the sites by Methodist preachers, Plans of both sites appear inside the foldout back cover.

Guidebook: Stanton Drew Circles

StantonDrew_MPBW

Revised 1969

The series of stone circles at Stanton Drew in Bath and Avon (formerly Somerset) were placed under the protection of the Ancient Monuments Protection Act (1882). For an overview of the site see English Heritage.

The guide was prepared by L.V. Grinsell (who also wrote the guide for Hetty Pegler’s Tump). It consists of 7 pages (the back page is blank) and contains a plan of the three circles in the centre pages. There is a short history of the site (noting the date to between 2000 and 1400 BC) and then descriptions of the Great Circle and Avenue, the North-eastern Circle, the South-western Circle, the Cove, and Hautville’s Quoit. In addition there is a section on Stanton Drew in Folk Tradition, and a review of the literature from John Aubrey (1664) and William Stukeley (1776).

Shap Abbey: guidebook

Shap_MPBW

1963 (3rd impress. with amendments)

The Premonstratensian abbey at Shap was founded in the 12th century. The remains were placed in State Guardianship by the Lowther Estates in 1948.

The MPBW guide was first published in 1963. It was divided into two sections, each by separate authors (a pattern found for other sites, e.g. guides prepared by James S. Richardson). The history was prepared by H.M. Colvin of St John’s College, Oxford (pp. 3–5), followed by the Architectural History (pp. 5–6) and Description (pp. 6–15) by R. Gilyard-Beer. A fold-out plan of the abbey was placed inside the back cover. There are four black and white plates, including a pen drawing of 1859 and a Buck engraving of 1739.

Middleham Castle: guidebooks

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Middleham Castle, looking north from the keep © David Gill

Middleham Castle was placed in state guardianship in 1925. The first guidebook was prepared by (Sir) Charles Peers in 1933; a second edition appeared in 1965. The guide would be followed by other Yorkshire castles: Richmond (1934) and Helmsley (1946).

This remained in print until 1984 when it was replaced by a new English Heritage guide by Beric Morley.

Middleham_DOE

This paper guide consists of six pages, i.e. each side with three pages. A plan was printed in the centre. It consisted of a short history followed by a description.

Middleham_EH_1993

1993

Morley’s guide was replaced in 1993 by a new guide prepared by John Weaver. This contains a tour and description, followed by a history. There are numerous colour images and plans

Middleham_EH

1998 [2014]

Weaver’s guide was updated in 1998.

Huntingtower: guidebooks

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Huntingtower © David Gill

Huntingtower, near Perth, was placed in State Guardianship in 1912. James S. Richardson prepared the first guidebook in 1931. A second edition appeared in 1950 and continued in print into the 1970s. The blue guide uses a detail from the ceiling inside the castle. Richardson’s guide starts with historical notes (pp. 1–5), followed by a description (pp. 6–9). Black and white photographs, as well as floor plans appear in the centre of the guide. He comments:

Viewed from any point, Huntingtower presents a picturesque appearance; the broken line of walling, the corbelled parapets with their subdued corner rounds and the corbie-stepped gables give the visitor an impression of a Scottish fortified-house of the 16th century, divested of its outer defensive works, garden and orchard.

Huntingtower_blue

1st ed. 1931; 2nd ed. 1950 (4th impress. 1972)

A third edition of Richardson’s guide was published in 1982. Historical notes have been replaced by history, and description by descriptive tour. Photographs and plans are incorporated in the text.

Huntingtower_3rd

1982, 3rd edition

Huntingtower_HS

HMSO 1989 (Historic Scotland 1996, 2001)

Richardson’s guide was replaced in 1989 by a new guide by Denys Pringle. There are two main sections: the story of Huntingtower, and the architecture of Huntingtower. The centre pages provide a short tour of the castle. Floor plans are printed inside the back cover.