Whithorn: museum signs


Whithorn Museum © David Gill

We have commented on the wonderful Historic Scotland museum at Whithorn. The old Ministry sign is displayed in addition to the new HES information board.


Whithorn Museum © David Gill

Above the door is an inscription in both Latin and English dating to 1730 recording the benefaction of both the parish and town (donis parochiae et urbis structa).


Whithorn Museum, inscription © David Gill

London: Roman Amphitheatre


London, Roman Amphitheatre © David Gill

The amphitheatre of Londinium lies in the north-west of the Roman town. It was discovered near to the Guildhall in the City of London in 1988 as part of the development of the area prior to the creation of the new Guildhall Art Gallery.

The amphitheatre appears to date to c. AD 74 or 75 based on dendrochronology. One of the timbers from the seating had Latin markings. The structure was adapted in the 90s, and expanded, in stone, during the reign of the emperor Hadrian.

Some of the remains have been preserved (and scheduled) in the basement of the Art Gallery. Visitors enter from the east through the main entrance. The sense of space has been recreated by lit displays.



See here for an earlier guide to the remains of Roman London.

Chesters Roman Fort: defences


Chesters Roman fort © David Gill

The Roman cavalry fort at Chesters is partially excavated and is now in the care of English Heritage. There are substantial remains of the south-east angle tower. An interval tower was placed between the angle and the south gate.


Chesters Roman fort © David Gill

Thetford Priory: Sacristry


Thetford Priory © David Gill

The sacristry at Thetford Priory formed part of the original early 12th century building, started in 1107.


Thetford Priory © David Gill

The sacristry was originally smaller with an apse at the east end. It was expanded to the east at the beginning of the 16th century. The Chapter House lay to the south of the sacristry.


Thetford Priory © David Gill


Thetford Priory © David Gill

The sacristry was entered from the south end of the south transept. It was also built with access to the cloister (to the west) but this entrance was blocked.


Thetford Priory © David Gill


Thetford Priory © David Gill

The later sacristry was entered from the north transept. It was constructed c. 1475–1540. A small oven was placed in the south-east corner.

The sacristry contained fragments of a mid-16th century tomb that appears to have been in preparation for installation in the church. (For other tombs, see here.)


Thetford Priory © David Gill


Thetford Priory © David Gill

Access on Hadrian’s Wall


Hadrian’s Wall © David Gill

Hadrian’s Wall is now a popular walking route. But parts, or just the line, cross private land and walkers are diverted. This Ministry of Works sign, lurking in the undergrowth was placed to stop access north across the ditch that would link to the next section of the wall.

Out of Bounds at Berwick-upon-Tweed


Berwick-upon-Tweed © C. Gill

The fortified town of Berwick-upon-Tweed is well worth a visit (see English Heritage). A good place to start is the former military barracks where there is a rather unusual Ministry sign.

St Olave’s Priory: undercroft


St Olave’s Priory © David Gill

The refectory undercroft at St Olave’s Priory in Norfolk is in remarkable condition. The bricked in doorway led from the undercroft to the kitchen court.


St Olave’s Priory © David Gill