Caerleon: Roman barracks

Caerleon © David Gill

A set of Roman barracks from the legionary fortress at Caerleon (Isca Silurum) lies in the north-west corner in a location known as Prysg Field. They were excavated by Victor Nash-Williams from 1927 to 1929. Each of the four blocks that can be viewed would have held a century. The accommodation for the centurion was placed at the end of each block.

Caerleon © David Gill

Dryburgh Abbey: main west door

Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

In 1385 the English army under King Richard II sacked three of the monasteries along the line of Dere Street: these included Dryburgh and Melrose. The western entrance to the abbey church was rebuilt in the 15th century in part due to the award of properties by Richard III.

A window would have been placed immediately above the doorway.

Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

Carnasserie Castle: signs

Carnasserie Castle © David Gill

Canrasserie Castle lies to the north of Kilmartin village. In February 1559 the castle was awarded to John Carswell (c. 1522–1572) [ODNB], the minister of Kilmartin. (Note the alternative spelling on the site sign.) In 1567 he was presented as bishop of the Isles. One of his main contributions was his translation of the Book of Common Order (1564) into Gaelic, Foirm na n-urrnuidheadh (1567).

The present castle was constructed between 1565 and 1572, replacing an earlier building. The castle was destroyed in 1685 during the rebellion of the 9th Earl of Argyll.

Carnasserie Castle © David Gill

Brunton Turret: Ministry of Works signage

Brunton Turret (1985) © David Gill

Brunton Turret (T26b) is included in a well preserved stretch of Hadrian’s Wall, just to the east of the River North Tyne (and Chesters Roman fort). The Ministry of Works sign (since removed) reminded visitors not to damage the monument. It is perhaps ironic that Brunton Turret was the target of illegal detecting.

Brunton Turret from the west © David Gill

Finchale Priory: Prior’s lodgings

Finchale Priory © David Gill

The prior’s lodgings are at the east end of the complex.

Finchale Priory © David Gill
Finchale Priory © David Gill

A chapel was placed on the south side of the rooms, and a study to the north.

Finchale Priory © David Gill
Finchale Priory © David Gill

Melrose Abbey: danger sign

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

This is a variant of the more usual, ‘Danger. Do not climb on the walls’ sign (e.g. Bury St Edmunds Abbey; Hadleigh Castle; Kirkham Priory; Lindisfarne Priory; Pickering Castle; Warkworth Castle). Lindsifarne also has, ‘Danger. Do not climb’.

Melrose Abbey: east processional doorway

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Access between the great cloister and the abbey church was by a processional doorway on the north side of the church. It was situated adjacent to the monks’ quire.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The joist holes supported the roof covering the walkways round the cloister.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Hadrian’s Wall: Benwell Vallum Crossing

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Benwell © David Gill

The vallum crossing lay 55 m from the south gateway of the cavalry fort at Benwell (Condercum). The crossing has a monumental gateway, 3.56 m wide, which was controlled from the north.

The vallum crossing is in the care of English Heritage (with links to plan).

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Benwell © David Gill

Leicester: the Roman baths

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Leicester © David Gill

The ‘Jewry Wall’ forms part of the bath complex in the Roman town of Ratae Coritanorum (Leicester). It is now dated to c. AD 160 (rather than AD 125–130). The masonry remains are in State Guardianship.

See English Heritage.

Melrose Abbey: commendator’s house

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The Commendator’s House at Melrose Abbey was constructed in the 15th century although its original function is not clear. It became the Commendator’s House in 1590 (recorded above the lintel of the house) after the Reformation.

It now house the site museum that includes finds from the nearby Roman fort at Newstead.

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Melrose Abbey, Commendator’s House © David Gill