Finchale Priory: Chapter House

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

The Chapter House lies in the middle of the east side of the cloister, underneath the Dorter. It has been dated to the late 13th century. Stone benches were placed around the outer walls. The prior’s seat was located in the centre of the east side; the central window behind it was blocked during the 15th century.

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Finchale Priory © David Gill
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Finchale Priory © David Gill

Roman roads in State Guardianship

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Wheeldale Moor Roman Road © David Gill

The construction of roads transformed the landscape of Britain. Yet only a limited number of fragments have been placed in State Guardianship. One of the most dramatic sections is a stretch that crosses Wheeldale Moor in North Yorkshire.

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Wheeldale Moor Roman Road © David Gill

A stretch of Dere Street near Soutra in Scotland has been preserved. This passed through Corbridge and Newstead.

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Dere Street © David Gill
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Dere Street near Soutra Aisle © David Gill

Further south Dere Street crossed the river Tees at Piercebridge and remains of the bridge have been found.

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Piercebridge © David Gill

A Roman milestone on the Stanegate near the fort of Vindolanda was placed in Guardianship.

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Vindolanda, Roman milestone © David Gill

 

Colchester: Roman walls

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Colchester © David Gill

There are still substantial remains of the Roman walls surrounding the colony at Colchester (Camulodunum). The more recent civic desire to protect the Roman heritage of the town is made clear in the signs discouraging exploration of the walls (‘by checking children … climbing upon or otherwise injuring it … any wilful damage to it’).

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Colchester, town wall © David Gill

Signage on Aegina

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Colonna, Aegina © David Gill

We have been noting the heritage of signs at various sites in State Guardianship in England, Wales, and Scotland. The complexity of architectural features at archaeological sites in Greece is resolved by the placing of signs to explain the elements to visitors.

In this view of part of the temenos of Apollo on Aegina (the Kolonna site), the different phases of the sanctuary wall (one from the archaic period, and the other from the Late Roman phase) are indicated in Greek and German (reflecting the language of the excavators of the site).

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Colonna, Aegina © David Gill

Lanercost Priory: warning sign

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Lanercost Priory © David Gill

The Ministry of Works sign at Lanercost Priory uses strong language (‘forbidden’) to discourage visitors from exploring the site. Similar signs are found at Brough and Brougham Castles.

Alternative wording is found at other sites.

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Lindisfarne © David Gill
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Lindisfarne © David Gill