The Tin Coast and Poldark

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The Crowns Engine Houses at Botallack © David Gill

The BBC Drama Series ‘Poldark‘ is set in Cornwall in what is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The ‘Tin Coast‘ includes the Crowns Engine Houses at Botallack in the care of the National Trust.

Heritage locations used in the filming of the series have been listed by Visit Cornwall.

Leading Visitor Attractions 2018: National Trust

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Waddesdon Manor © David Gill

The figures for Leading Visitor Attractions in 2018 have been published. The top National Trust sites are:

  • Giants Causeway [35]: 1,011,473 [+2.7%]
  • Clumber Park [59]: 657,443 [+4%]
  • Carrick-a-Rede [72]: 491,947 [+13%]
  • Attingham Park [73]: 484,581 [+4%]
  • Cliveden [74]: 483,754 [-1%]
  • Waddesdon Manor [77]: 466,158 [-0.86%]
  • Belton House [83]: 422,682 [-5%]
  • Stourhead [86]: 393,779 [+3%]
  • Fountains Abbey Estate [88]: 388,500 [-8%]
  • Calke Abbey [90]: 384,561 [-1%]
  • Mottisfont [92]: 376,043 [+3%]
  • Anglesey Abbey [93]: 370,506 [-5%]
  • Nymans Garden [99]: 354,502 [+4%]
  • Kingston Lacy [101]: 353,653 [+9%]
  • St Michael’s Mount [103]: 347,773 [-1%]
  • Polesden Lacey [104]: 347,149 [-2%]
  • Dunham Massey [110]: 310,093 [+7%]
  • Sheffield Park [111]: 306,692 [+8%]
  • Wimpole Estate [113]: 304,191 [-12%]
  • Tyntesfield [116]: 301,765 [-3%]
  • Hardwick Hall [119]: 285,379 [+2%]
  • Lanhydrock [120]: 273,149 [+4%]
  • Killerton [121]: 267,383 [+7%]
  • Bodnant Garden [125]: 254,227 [+1%]
  • Ickworth [126]: 254,073 [-7%]
  • Dyrham Park [127]: 251,631 [0%]
  • Chartwell [128]: 246,336 [+3%]
  • Quarry Bank [130]: 240,277 [-5%]
  • Corfe Castle [131]: 237,992 [-4%]
  • Wallington [132]: 236,825 [+1%]
  • Cragside Estate [133]: 236,672 [+3%]
  • Mount Stewart [137]: 226,577 [+4%]
  • Baddesley Clinton [140]: 221,703 [+1%]
  • Trelissick [141]: 214,034 [+7%]
  • Saltram [146]: 209,755 [+7%]
  • Stowe [147]: 208,644 [-1%]
  • Charlecote Park [148]: 208,289 [-5%]
  • Dunster Castle [150]: 204,625 [-2%]
  • Speke Hall [151]: 204,134 [+6%]
  • Shugborough Estate [152]: 203,652 [+27%]
  • Packwood House [153]: 202,114 [-8%]
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Stowe © David Gill

Leading Visitor Attractions 2018: English Heritage

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The figures for Leading Visitor Attractions in 2018 have been published. The top English Heritage sites are:

  • Stonehenge [20]: 1,555,868 [-1.7%]. 2017: 1,582,532 [+14.5%]
  • Dover Castle [95]: 365,462 [-3.8%]. 2017: 379,740 [+13.9%]
  • Osborne [112]: 304,927 [-1.3%]. 2017: 308,861 [+16.1%]
  • Tintagel Castle [135]: 230,584 [-6.3%]. 2017: 246,039 [+7.1%]
  • Carlisle Castle [158]: 177,247 [+285.4%]
  • Audley End House and Gardens [160]: 170,042 [-5.1%]. 2017: 179,167 [+8.1%]
  • Clifford’s Tower, York [163]: 154,701 [+0.4%]. 2017: 154,135 [+5.1%]
  • Whitby Abbey [165]: 147,566 [-11.3%]. 2017: 166,362 [+9.6%]
  • Kenwood [171]: 131,126 [-8.6%]. 2017: 143,490 [+6.8%]
  • Wrest Park [172]: 128,980 [-5.9%]. 2017: 137,131 [+10.3%]
  • Carisbrooke Castle [174]: 125,664 [-0.7%]. 2017: 126,584 [-0.3%]
  • 1066 Battle of Hastings, Abbey and Battlefield [176]: 123,870 [+0.5%]. 2017: 123,220 [-10.6%]
  • Eltham Palace and Gardens [180]: 110,034 [+0.5%]. 2017: 109,501 [+12.5%]
  • Kenilworth Castle [181]: 110,012 [-6.8%]. 2017: 118,090 [+9.3%]
  • Housesteads Roman Fort [182]: 109,675 [+0.9%]. 2017: 108,660 [+6.5%]
  • Walmer Castle and Gardens [184]: 103,905 [-4.7%]. 2017: 109,005 [+18.8%]

Overall English Heritage seems to have been attracting fewer visitors during 2018.

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Eltham Palace © David Gill

Leading Visitor Attractions 2018: National Trust for Scotland

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Broughton House © David Gill

The details of the Leading Visitor Attractions for 2018 are now available.  The National Trust for Scotland locations are:

  • Glenfinnan [89]: 385,352 [-2.8%]. 2017: 396,448 [+57.8%]
  • Culzean Castle & Country Park [91]: 382,608 [+56.2%]. 2017: 244,930 [+11.6%]
  • Burns Birthplace Museum [122]: 266,36  [+62.1%]. 2017: 164,316 [+1.2%]
  • Brodie Castle [124]: 256,666 [+21.8%]
  • Glencoe [142]: 213,343 [+29.1%]
  • Culloden [143]: 213,343 [+10.9%]. 2017: 180,875 [+27.6%]
  • Crathes Castle [173]: 127,695 [+4.8%]. 2017: 121,841 [+23.7%]
  • Threave Castle [186]: 96,357 [+1.5%]
  • Inverewe Gardens [192]: 80,913 [-57.8%]. 2017: 191,951 [+109.6%]
  • Newhailes [199] 68,360 [+1168.7%]
  • Pollok House [205]: 57,172 [+5.1%]
  • Fyvie Castle [207]: 56,158 [-0.2%]
  • Drum Castle [208]: 50,421 [+8.3%]. 2017: 46,574 [-3%]
  • Falkland Palace [211]: 46,475 [-8.4%]. 2017: 50,726 [+15.1%]
  • Bannockburn [212]: 45,208 [-18.3%]. 2017: 55,347 [+7.9%]
  • Pitmedden Garden [213]: 41,694 [-3.1%]. 2017: 43,045 [+17.9%]
  • Brodick Castle & Country Park [216]: 39,708 [-10.4%]. 2017: 44,361 [-38.1%]
  • Georgian House [222]: 33,450 [-11.3%]
  • Ben Lawers Visitor Centre [229]: 24,728 [-12.3%]
  • Culross Palace [230]: 24,445 [+52.6%]
  • Craigievar Castle [232]: 19,702 [+15.6%]
  • Leith Hall [233]: 19,332 [-1.8%]
  • Tenement House [237]: 17,053 [-5.3%]
  • Kellie Castle [238]: 17,003 [+5.8%]
  • Broughton House & Garden [239]: 16,843 [+8.2%]
  • Greenbank Garden [240]: 16,327 [+2.4%]
  • Hill House [243]: 12,150 [-57.4%]. 2017: 28,518 [+6.2%]
  • Geilston Garden [244]: 12,110 [+17%]
  • Gladstones Land [245]: 11,670 [-3.2%]. 2017: 12,061 [-44.7%]

There is wider coverage of NTS in the ALVA figures for 2018. Bannockburn’s visitor numbers are a surprise given the increase in HES numbers for Stirling Castle.

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Glenfinnan © David Gill

Leading Visitor Attractions 2018: Historic Environment Scotland

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Linlithgow Palace © David Gill

The figures for the Leading Visitor Attractions 2018 are now available. There are a number of sites in the care of Historic Environment Scotland:

  • Edinburgh Castle [12]: 2,111,578 [+2%]. 2017: 2,063,709 [+16%]
  • Stirling Castle [63]: 605,241 [+7%]. 2017: 567,259 [+18%]
  • Urquhart Castle [69]: 518,195 [+6%]. 2017: 488,136 [+23%]
  • Glasgow Cathedral [75]: 482,783 [+24%]. 2017: 389,101 [+36%]
  • Doune Castle [170]: 142,091 [+14%]. 2017: 124,341 [+38%]
  • Skara Brae [179]: 111,921 [+2%]. 2017: 110,028 [+18%]
  • Linlithgow Palace [187]: 94,718 [+9%]. 2017: 86,596 [+16%]
  • St Andrews Castle [188]: 91,302 [+1%]. 2017: 90,617 [+18%]
  • Fort George [198]: 71,906 [-5%]. 2017: 75,798 [+24%]
  • Iona Abbey [200]: 64,183 [-3%]. 2017: 66,224 [+2%]
  • Blackness Castle [203]: 58,388 [+36%]. 2017 42,810 [+42%]
  • Melrose Abbey [204]: 58,286 [-1%]. 2017:  58,989 [+11%]
  • St Andrews Cathedral [206]: 56,249 [-4%]. 2017:  58,395 [+26%]
  • Tantallon Castle [213]: 43,170 [-14%]. 2017: 49,955 [+17%]
  • Elgin Cathedral [217]: 39,398 [+3%]. 2017: 38,201 [+25%]
  • Craigmillar Castle [220]: 35,442 [+13%]. 2017: 31,269 [+35%]
  • Caerlaverock Castle [221]: 35,305 [-8%]. 2017: 38,540 [+8%]
  • Dirleton Castle [224]: 29,764 [-2%]. 2017: 30,219 [+8%]
  • Dumbarton Castle [226]: 28,546 [+6%]. 2017: 27,033 [+12%]
  • Maeshowe [228]: 28,414 [+11%].
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Iona © David Gill

The enduring love affair with railway design

As a nation, despite our grumbling about the state of the railway system and its operation, deep down we seem collectively to continue to have a close affection for ideas of design in the railways in Britain. Quite apart from the engineering aspects of the railway, rolling stock, engines and the perceived romanticism of bygone rail travel, the architecture and form of the infrastructure and the visual communication methods deployed by the rail companies themselves continue to have a distinct ‘heritage’ aesthetic, even when newly created. There has long been a tradition in railway advertising of using historic sites at locations which the railway served or passed by.

This has been seen most recently in advertising campaign rolled out by GWR – itself a relaunched heritage brand harking back to the days before British Rail (also a distinct heritage brand with a very strong design heritage). The advertising seen across the rail network in the west of England and in the London termini have drawn on the classic childrens’ literature aesthetic centred around Enid Blyton’s Famous Five to create a sense of adventure, discovery, social relations, holidays and the idea of it being fun to travel by rail. Various buildings and landscapes across the south west have been depicted as well, producing an interesting layering of heritage messages and associations with this form of travel

Is Britain set to pull out of UNESCO?

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Cornwall Mining Landscape © David Gill

The International Development Secretary, Penny Mordaunt, has suggested that the UK should withdraw from UNESCO (Emily Thornberry, “UK withdrawal from Unesco would be historical and cultural vandalism“, The Guardian 13 November 2018). The UK (and its dependencies) is home to 31 sites inscribed on the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites.

The report reminds its readers of the economic value of UNESCO World Heritage status: “Britain makes a net gain from our membership of Unesco: we contributed £11m to the agency this year, versus £100m value added to our economy from its designation of our heritage sites”.

Heritage sites, indeed inscribed UNESCO World Heritage sites, form part of the UK Government tourism strategy to attract more visitors. Had Mourdant taken the time to understand the benefits of the UK remaining a member of UNESCO?

It is reported that Mordaunt’s proposal has been rejected by No. 10.

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