Academic journals: Journal of Tourism History

Journal Summary: The Journal of Tourism History covers all aspects of the evolution of tourism from earliest times to the postwar world. Articles address all regions of the globe and often adopt interdisciplinary approaches for exploring the past.
The Journal of Tourism History is particularly (though not exclusively) interested in promoting the study of areas and subjects underrepresented in current scholarship, work for example examining the history of tourism in Asia and Africa, as well as developments that took place before the nineteenth century.
In addition to peer-reviewed articles, Journal of Tourism History also features short articles about particularly useful archival collections, book reviews, review essays, and round table discussions that explore developing areas of tourism scholarship. It encourages further exploration of issues such as the vectors along which tourism spread, the evolution of specific types of ‘niche’ tourism, and the intersections of tourism history with the environment, medicine, politics, and more.

Publisher: Routledge

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjth20/current

Access: Subcription; some open access

Journal Type: Academic peer-reviewed

Academic journals: Journal of Tourism Futures

Journal summary: The Journal of Tourism Futures is a result of the growing awareness, in academia but especially in the professional world, of the increasing importance of tourism as a social phenomenon and as an economic sector. If we see that the impact on our lives, our culture and our economy is growing, it becomes urgent that we understand how things will evolve, which variables determine this development and where we should intervene. The goal of this initiative is to bring academic rigour to the study of the future of tourism.
The aims of the journal are:
• To inspire the tourism industry and academic community about the future of tourism
• The dissemination and formulation of the body of knowledge called tourism futures to practitioners, educators, researchers and students.
• To provide an international forum for a wide range of practical, theoretical and applied research within the field of tourism futures
• To represent a multi-disciplinary set of views on key and emerging issues in tourism futures.
• To include a cross-section of methodologies and viewpoints on research, including quantitative and qualitative approaches, case studies, and empirical and theoretical studies.
• To encourage greater understanding and linkage between the fields of study related to tourism futures.
• To publish new and original ideas.
The scope of the journal is:
• To serve and reflect the tremendous growth in research and discussions in tourism futures.
• To take a broad and multi-disciplinary approach to the future, whether it is short term or long term or economics or consumer behaviour. However, the journal will not comprise its position that all papers must be about the “future” and “tourism”.
• To encourage papers that stretch the current boundaries of the fields and develop new areas and new linkages with other relevant areas or combine or introduce new approaches and methodologies.
• To welcome creative and innovative approaches and papers that introduce new concepts and ideas.

Publisher: Emerald

Website: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/jtf

Access: Subscription; some open access

Journal Type: Academic peer-reviewed

Rome: The Hadrianeum

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Relief probably from the Hadrianeum (Capitoline Museum) © David Gill

The Hadrianeum in Rome lay in the Campus Martius on the west side of the Via Lata, to the south of the Ara Pacis. Parts of the temple can be seen along one side of the Piazza di Pietra. Eleven Corinthian columns, made of Proconnesian marble, as well as the north side of the cella are incorporated into the Borsa.

There is no epigraphic evidence to confirm the identity of the temple although Antoninus Pius dedicated one to him in this area in AD 145; this is the most likely interpretation for this structure.

A series of 24 reliefs cut from Proconnesian marble have been associated with the temple. They were probably incorporated on the cella. The figure shown here, holding a vexillum, probably represents the province of Mauretania. The relief showing shields and an axe probably represent trophies.

For more of the reliefs, including those in Naples, see Following Hadrian.

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The Hadrianeum, Rome © David Gill
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Relief from the Hadrianeum, Rome (Capitoline Museum) © David Gill

Academic Journals: Journal of the History of Collecting

Journal Summary: The Journal of the History of Collections is dedicated to providing the clearest insight into all aspects of collecting activity. For centuries collecting has been the pursuit of princes and apothecaries, scholars and amatuers alike. Only recently, however, has the study of collections and their collectors become the subject of great multidisciplinary interest. The range of the Journal of the History of Collections embraces the contents of collections, the processes which initiated their formation, and the circumstances of the collectors themselves. As well as publishing original papers, the Journal includes listings of forthcoming events, conferences, and reviews of relevant publications and exhibitions, making it the most comprehensive source available on a subject of increasing interest and study.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Website: https://academic.oup.com/jhc

Access: Subscription; some open access

Journal Type: Academic peer-reviewed

Top 10 Heritage Sites for Wiltshire

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Avebury © David Gill

This is a personal list of heritage sites for Wiltshire.

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Avebury © David Gill

Avebury. This must be one of the most impressive prehistoric sites in England. The village of Avebury sits within the Henge. The monument is placed in the middle of a rich archaeological landscape.

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Silbury Hill © David Gill

Silbury Hill. This artificial hill dominates the land around it and forms part of the Avebury landscape.

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Stonehenge © David Gill

Stonehenge. This must be one of the most iconic prehistoric sites in England with the trilithons.

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Old Sarum © David Gill

Old Sarum. The foundations of the original cathedral and the medieval castle sit within an Iron Age hillfort.

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Salisbury Cathedral © David Gill

Salisbury Cathedral. The cathedral dominates the city of Salisbury. The foundation stone was laid in 1220 and it was consecrated in 1258.

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Bemerton © David Gill

Bemerton. The exquisite Bemerton church has associations with the poet George Herbert.

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Wilton House © David Gill

Wilton House. This is one of the most impressive houses in Wiltshire granted to the Pembrokes in 1544.

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Lacock Abbey © David Gill

Lacock Abbey. Parts of the former nunnery can be seen within the later house. Lacock is important for the birth of modern photography (in 1835).

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Bowood © David Gill

Bowood. The orangery (part of the 1768 south front) and the grounds hint at the grandeur of this estate. The main house was destroyed by fire in 1955.

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Stourhead © David Gill

Stourhead. This is one of the top landscapes gardens in Britain. It was originally laid out between 1722 and 1787. Among the buildings is Henry Flitcroft’s Pantheon (1753).

 

Academic journals: Journal of Sustainable Tourism

Journal Summary: The Journal of Sustainable Tourism is a tourism journal which advances critical understanding of the relationships between tourism and sustainable development. It publishes theoretical, conceptual and empirical research that explores one or more of the economic, social, cultural, political, organisational or environmental aspects of the subject. Critical views and perspectives are encouraged, as well as new ideas and approaches in relation to the theory and practice linking tourism and sustainability. Contributions can be from all disciplinary perspectives, with inter-disciplinary work especially welcome. Holistic and integrative work is encouraged. All geographical areas are included, as are all forms of tourism, both mass and niche market. Papers can be especially useful if they contribute new understanding and insights not just to the field of sustainable tourism but also to the wider social sciences or between the social and natural sciences. Many contributions include significant empirical evidence, but some innovate in the field by providing new perspectives, approaches and insights through critical reviews.

Publisher: Routledge

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsus20/current

Access: Subscription

Journal Type: Peer-reviewed; some open access

St Mawes: John Leland’s texts

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St Mawes © David Gill

The Tudor Royal Arms were placed above the main entrance to the keep at St Mawes, with the Latin text, Dieu et Mon Droit, below. Above the crest is the statement:

Semper Honos / Henrice Tuus / Laudesque Manebunt.

(Henry, your honour and praises will remain forever.)

This is one of four texts composed by the poet, antiquary and royal chaplain, John Leland (c. 1503–1552) at the request of Thomas Treffry of Fowey (a detail mentioned in Leland’s Itinerary).

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St Mawes © David Gill
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St Mawes © David Gill

On the opposite side, above the door leading from the keep to the forward bastion is another Royal Coast of Arms. Either side are two Tritons:

Semper Vivet A(n)i(m)a Re/gis Henrici Octavi / Qui An(no) 34 Sui Reg/ni Hoc Fecit Fieri.

(May the soul of King Henry Eighth, who had this built in the 34th year of his reign, live forever.)

Henry came to the throne in 1509, and this places the completion of the castle in 1543. (It was started in 1540.)

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St Mawes © David Gill

Another text is placed above the crest on the west bastion, celebrating Henry’s son, Edward (who is proclaimed on the eastern bastion as Duke of Cornwall, a title given at his baptism in 1537).

Edwardus Fama Referat Factisque Parentem.

(May Edward resemble his father in fame and deeds.)

Further texts are placed on the south (Henry, king of England, France and Ireland) and east (Edward) bastions.