West Kennet Long Barrow: MPBW sign

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West Kennet Long Barrow © Patrick Taylor

The West Kennet long barrow was placed on the 1882 Schedule of Ancient Monuments. It now lies within the Avebury World Heritage Site. The scientific excavation took place in 1955–56.

Radiocarbon dates suggest that the monument was constructed in the period 3,700–3,600 BC, more than a millennium earlier than was thought in the 1960s.

Augustinian Abbeys and Priories in State Care

South and South-East England

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The church of St Mary, Portchester © David Gill

Southwick Priory, Hampshire [EH]. The community dates to 1133 when it was established by Henry I at Portchester. The priory moved to its present site within the next two decades.

Bushmead Priory, Bedfordshire [EH]. Founded c. 1195.

East Anglia

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St Botolph’s Priory © David Gill

St Botolph’s Priory, Colchester, Essex [EH]. The Augustinian priory was founded c. 1100. It was probably one of the earliest foundations in England.

Waltham Abbey, Essex [EH]. The Augustinian priory was founded in 1177 and it later became an abbey.

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Creake Abbey, Norfolk © David Gill

Creake Abbey, Norfolk [EH]. The monastic site has its origins in 1206, although the Augustinian priory is later.

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St Olave’s Priory © David Gill

St Olave’s Priory, Norfolk [EH]. The priory was founded c. 1216.

Central England

Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire [EH]. The Augustinian abbey was founded in 1135.

Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire [EH]. Founded around 1148.

White Ladies Priory, Shropshire (Augustinian canonesses) [EH]. This seems to have been founded in 1186.

 

Wales

Llanthony Priory, Gwent [Cadw]. The priory was established c. 1118.

Penmon Priory, Anglesey [Cadw]. The monastic community became an Augustinian priory in the 13th century.

North-East and Yorkshire

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Gisborough Priory © David Gill

Gisborough Priory, Yorkshire [EH]. There are two foundation dates in 1119 and 1129.

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Kirkham Priory © David Gill

Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire [EH]. Founded by Walter l’Espec c. 1122, probably on the site of an earlier foundation.

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Brinkburn Priory © David Gill

Brinkburn Priory, Northumberland [EH]. Founded by William Bertran between 1130 and 1135.

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Thornton Abbey © David Gill

Thornton Abbey, Lincolnshire [EH]. Founded in 1140.

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Lanercost Priory © David Gill

Lanercost Priory, Cumbria [EH]. The traditional foundation date of the priory is 1169 in memory of Hubert de Vaux.

Scotland

Holyrood, Midlothian [HES]. The Augustinian abbey was founded by King David I in 1128.

Restenneth, Angus [HES]. The Augustinian priory was established  by King David I.

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St Andrews © David Gill

St Andrews, Fife [HES]. The Augustinian foundation dates to c. 1130.

Jedburgh, Roxburghshire [HES]. The Augustinian priory was founded here in 1138 by King David I. This became an abbey in 1154.

Cambuskenneth, Stirlingshire (Augustinian of Arrouaise) [HES]. Founded around 1140 by King David I.

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Inchmahome Priory © David Gill

Inchmahome Priory, Perthshire [HES]. The priory was founded c. 1238 by the Earl of Menteith.

 

 

Lanyon Quoit

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Lanyon Quoit © David Gill

Lanyon Quoit is located near to Madron in Penwith. The remains formed part of a neolithic chambered tomb.

The stones were re-erected in 1824.

Ding Dong Mine sits on the skyline. This forms part of the UNESCO Cornwall & West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site.

Tintern Abbey: guidebooks

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Tintern Abbey © David Gill

Tintern Abbey was transferred to the Office of Works in 1914. The guidebook was prepared by the architect Sir Harold Brakspear (1934). Brakspear had helped to plan the ruins after they were purchased by the Crown in 1901, and before they were conserved.

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1956 (repr. 1968)

A replacement ‘blue guide’ was prepared by O.E. Craster in 1956. This took the standard pattern of history followed by description. A plan of the abbey was placed in the centre pages.

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1956 (9th impress. 1977)

Craster’s guide continued to be published into the 1970s. This included some elements in Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn (on the title page, but not on the cover), and a short summary of just over one page at the beginning.

The centre page plan was placed on a fold-out plan inside the back cover. The glossary was expanded to include: ashlar, barrel vault, conversi, garth, jamb, lay brother, lintel, mullion, novice, papal bull, plinth, pulpitum, quire, refectory, screen, vestment and vestry. It also dropped: aisle, bay, boss, capital, crossing, floriated, sexfoil.

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1960; 1964, 2nd ed.; 1967, 3rd impress.

Craster also prepared the illustrated souvenir guide (1960; 2nd ed. 1964). It included historical background; a tour of the abbey; the first tourists. The tour is numbered on the plan.

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1985

The tour in the souvenir guide in effect turns into the card guide that continued to be published under Cadw.

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1986; 2nd ed. 1990; 3rd ed. 1995; 4th ed. 2002

The Cadw guidebook was prepared by David M. Robinson. This includes a history of the abbey, a section on building the abbey, and a tour of the abbey. A foldout plan (in colour) is printed inside the back (card) cover.

Old Soar Manor: guidebook

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1950 (repr. 1968)

Old Soar Manor in Kent was acquired by the National Trust (1947) and subsequently placed in State Guardianship (1948). Margaret Wood prepared the paper guidebook in 1950 and it continued in print until the 1970s. The guide has a short history and a longer description. A floor plan of the house in c. 1290 is included.

Note the entry: ‘A National Trust property in the guardianship of the Ministry of Public Buildings and Works’.

Bolsover Castle: Manège

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Bolsover Castle, Riding House Range © David Gill

The Riding House Range at Bolsover Castle was built c. 1660. This reflect’s William Cavendish’s interest in Manège. Note the viewing gallery above the riders.

English Heritage has tried to recapture the way that this part of the castle was conceived by using this space for displays of dressage.

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Bolsover Castle, Riding House Range © David Gill

Stirling Castle: guidebooks

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Second edition 1948, 7th impression 1967

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2nd ed. 1948 (8th impress. 1972)

The first edition of the guide to Stirling Castle was published in 1936: the description by J.S. Richardson, and the history by Margaret E. Root. A second edition appeared in 1948, and it continued as a ‘blue guide’ into the 1970s (note the move from guide-book to guide).

A fold-out plan was placed inside the back cover.

The cover of the Richardson and Root guide is ‘a drawing of a portrait medallion representing James V, one of a set of wood panels originally in the ceiling of the King’s Presence Chamber’. The heads were the subject of a monograph published by the Royal Commission in 1960. A booklet was issued by the Royal Commission in 1975, with the text by John G. Dunbar.

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1975

The Historic Scotland guide by Richard Fawcett was published in 1999. This consisted of a guide tour followed by the story (not history) of the castle.

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1999 (repr. 2002)