Finchale Priory: dorter and reredorter

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

The dorter at Finchale Priory in Co. Durham is located on the east side of the cloister above the chapter house. It connected to the south transept of the church via a night stair. Sir Charles Peers suggested that the large room at the south end of the range ‘which in other monasteries served as a dayroom, is here too ill-lighted for such purpose, and at any rate in the later days of the priory can have been merely a storeroom’.

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

On the east side of the dorter was the reredorter.

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

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Finchale Priory, reredorter © David Gill

Dryburgh Abbey: the dorter

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

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Dryburgh Abbey, Dorter © David Gill

The dorter (or dormitory) at Dryburgh Abbey is located on the first floor on the east side of the cloister. It lay above the chapter house and the warming house.

In the 16th century a residence was constructed in the space above the chapter house.

The Ministry signs use the term ‘dormitory’ rather than the Latin ‘dorter’.

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Dryburgh Abbey, east side of the cloister © David Gill

Remains of one of the windows of the dorter can still be seen.

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

It was accessed via the night stairs that lead into the south transept of the church.

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

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Dryburgh Abbey, night stairs © David Gill

The day stairs were located on the south side of the chapter house.

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

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Dryburgh Abbey, Day Stair © David Gill

Dryburgh Abbey: book cupboard

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

A book cupboard is located on the east side of the cloister at Dryburgh Abbey. It is adjacent into the main east processional doorway into the church, and on the other side the library and vestry.

J.S. Richardson (in the ‘Blue Guide’) noted: ‘Near the processional doorway is a wall-press or aumbry, once fitted with doors and shelves to contain the books used in the cloister’.

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

 

Melrose Abbey: roof viewpoint

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

It is possible to view the upper parts of Melrose Abbey via a spiral staircase on the west side of the south transept of the church.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Lindisfarne Priory: brewhouse

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Lindisfarne Priory

The brewhouse at Lindisfarne Priory is located in the south range adjacent to the bakehouse. This part of the priory was constructed in the 1360s. The north-west corner contains a kiln.

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Lindisfarne Priory, brewhouse © David Gill

South transept at Thornton Abbey

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South transept, Thornton Abbey © David Gill

The south transept is one of the best preserved parts of the church at Thornton Abbey, on the south side of the Humber. The Augustinian abbey was founded in 1139 from Kirkham Priory in Yorkshire. The church seems to have been rebuilt c. 1264.

The guidebook is by Sir Alfred Clapham and P.K. Baillie Reynolds. The remains are in the care of English Heritage.

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Thornton Abbey © David Gill

Finchale Priory: children and heritage sites

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

The Benedictine priory of Finchale Priory in County Durham is situated in a bend of the river Wear.

There are two Ministry signs warning of the dangers to be found at a heritage site: one on the north side of the church, and the other at the first floor entrance to the hall.

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

The guidebook was written by Sir Charles Peers.