Dirleton: Gazebo

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Dirleton Gardens © David Gill

The gardens at Dirleton are a delight. In the corner of the 1860s and 1920s garden is a gazebo, suitably signed.

Dirleton is in the care of Historic Scotland.

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Dirleton Gardens © David Gill

Pevensey Castle: WW2 defences

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Pevensey Castle © David Gill

The fall of France in the spring of 1940 meant that Sussex became the front line. The ruins of Pevensey Castle—a Roman Saxon Shore fort as well as a medieval castle—were used to disguised strong points. Teams from the Ministry assisted with the construction of the defences so that they would blend into the ruins of the Roman and medieval walls.

This pill box was mounted on the wall of the medieval keep. Note the Ministry sign placed below it: ‘Gun Emplacement / 1939-1945’.

Pevensey Castle: signage

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Pevensey Castle © David Gill

Pevensey Castle was given to the Office of Works by the Duke of Devonshire in 1925. It became one of the front line defences of Britain in 1940.

Pevensey Castle was one of the Saxon Shore forts and was later reused as a medieval castle.

For guidebooks to the fort and castle see here.

Castle Rising: Guidebooks

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1978

Castle Rising was placed in state care in 1958. Prior to this it had been in the estate of the Hoard family. During this phase William Taylor wrote his History and Antiquities of Castle Rising, Norfolk (c. 1850).

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1929

Harry Lawrence Bradfer-Lawrence prepared Castle Rising: A Short History and Description of the Castle with Illustrations (1929). This continued in print until 1954.

R. Allen Brown produced the Department of the Environment guide in 1978. This was reprinted in 1984, and then issued by by English Heritage in 1987, with reprints as late as 1996. R. Allen Brown also wrote the guides to Dover Castle, Orford Castle, and Rochester Castle.

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1987 (1992)

Dartmouth Castle: Guidebooks

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1951 (repr. 1954)

Dartmouth Castle was placed in the care of the Office of Works in 1909, although the War Office retained the right to use the structure. It was finally placed in State Guardianship in 1970.

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1965

B.H. St. John O’Neil wrote the first guide to the castle in 1934, followed by a paper guide in 1951. It was followed by a Ministry of Public Buildings and Works souvenir guide in 1965. This was written by A.D. Saunders. The printer was W.S. Cowell of the Butter Market, Ipswich. This guide took the format: Introduction; Early Defences; The Building of the Castle; Kingswear Castle; Bayard’s Cove; Sixteenth-Century Repairs and Additions; The Civil War; Later History; Description.

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1988 (2nd ed.)

Saunders’ guide continued into the period of English Heritage. It was reprinted in 1983, with a second edition in 1988. This carried the branding of Gateway supermarkets. The format was altered, starting with a description and then the history. An expanded third edition appeared in 1991.

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1991 (1993)

Heritage Scaffolding

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Signage at Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

The Governor’s House at Dumbarton Castle was in a state of restoration during a visit in 2015. But Historic Scotland had provided an information panel about the use of scaffolding over time.

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Entrance to King George’s Battery at Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

King George’s Battery was created in 1735.

Portencross Castle

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Portencross Castle © David Gill

Portencross Castle is built on the Firth of Clyde and dates back to the 14th century. It faces the islands of Bute and (a little further away) Arran.

The castle was scheduled in 1955. It is now managed by the Friends of Portencross Castle who have been able to open up the castle with the support of HLF and Historic Scotland.

During the Second World War the castle was surveyed by Vere Gordon Childe.