Goodrich Castle: guidebooks

Goodrich_MPBW

1958 (5th impress. 1967)

Goodrich Castle was placed in State Guardianship in 1920. The first official guidebook was prepared by C.A. Ralegh Radford, with a new edition in 1958. It consists of a history, with a section on periods of construction, then a description. A plan of the castle was included inside the guidebook at the start of the description.

Goodrich_DOE

1958 (9th impress. 1975)

The revised DOE blue guide has the foldout plan inside the back cover.

Goodrich_EH

1993 (repr. 1999)

The English Heritage guidebook was prepared by Derek Renn (whose other guides included Framlingham Castle, Old Sarum and Shell Keeps). This starts with a tour of the castle, walks along the river Wye, and a history of Goodrich. A plan of the castle is placed in the centre of the guide.

Tintagel Castle: guidebooks

100-2252

Tintagel © David Gill

Tintagel Castle was placed in State Guardianship by the Duchy of Cornwall in 1930. C.A. Ralegh Radford prepared the first guide 1935, with a second edition in 1939. It is introduced with a summary, followed by a history, periods of construction of the castle, and then the description. A foldout plan is placed inside the back cover. The later MPBW guidebook had an additional plan of the island inside the back cover.

Tintagel_MPBW

1939 (2nd ed., 10th impress. 1962)

Tintagel_MPBW_r

1939 (2nd ed., 14th impress. 1969)

The English Heritage guidebook was written by Brian K. Davison. It contains three sections: Tour and Description; History of Tintagel; the Legend of King Arthur. A plan of the island is placed inside the back cover.

Tintagel_EH

1999 (repr. 2002)

Cardoness Castle: notice signs

IMG_4421-Edit2

Cardoness Castle © David Gill

The top of Cardoness Castle provides views over the estuary. Visitors are discouraged from trying to get on top of the walls. One points out the danger, the other expressly forbids it.

IMG_4418-Edit

Cardoness Castle © David Gill

IMG_4413-Edit

Cardoness Castle © David Gill

The second reproduces the word ‘Notice’: surely redundant on a sign? And the clear indication that ‘visitors are not allowed on wall top’ is ‘by order’; underneath is an erased  line, ‘Ministry of Works’.

IMG_4415-Edit

Cardoness Castle © David Gill

St Andrews Castle: guidebooks

IMG_0642.JPG

St Andrews Castle © David Gill

St Andrews castle was placed in State Guardianship in 1911. Stewart Cruden, Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland, prepared the official guide (1951; 2nd ed. 1958). This starts with a history followed by a description. A block of black and white photographs appear in the centre section. A fold-out plan is printed inside the stiff back cover.

The cover device is described as follows:

An imaginative composition consisting of a saltire cross (for St Andrew and St Andrews) surrounded by battlementing typifying castles generally. The cinque-foil in each corner is the armorial device of Archbishop John Hamilton who erected the south front and placed this badge upon the work he did, in four carved medallions over the entrance.

StAndrews_castle_blue

1951; 2nd ed. 1958 (5th impress. 1970)

IMG_0639.JPG

St Andrews Castle © David Gill

A third edition of Cruden’s guidebook was published in 1982. The text is the same as the blue guide, but integrates photographs and plans with the text.

St_Andrews_cast_HS

1982 (3rd ed.)

The Historic Scotland souvenir guide was prepared by Richard Fawcett in 1992, and revised by Chris Tabraham and Doreen Grove in 2001. This colour guide starts with a guided tour followed by the story (not history) of the castle. There is a bird’s eye drawing to help visitors around the site, with numbered locations that relate to sections in the text.

StAndrews_castle_HS

1992 (rev. ed. 2001, repr. 2007)

Dumbarton Castle: Custodian’s Office

IMG_7721

Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

We may now think of staff at heritage sites being managers, but in the days of the Ministry they were clearly seen as Custodians (see also Sweetheart Abbey). Three signs at Dumbarton Castle on the north side of the Clyde retain the old terminology. Notice the omission of the apostrophe in one of the signs, as well as the different styles of arrow directing visitors to where they can obtain tickets. There is also the inclusion of the polite, ‘Please obtain …’.

IMG_7722

Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

Outside the present ticket office is a slightly more recent sign, reflecting the way that the custodian’s office is not only where tickets can be obtained, but where other items can now be purchased.

IMG_7723

Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

Llawhaden Castle: guidebook

Llawhaden_MPBW

Repr. 1969

Llawhaden Castle was constructed in the 12th century to protect the lands owned by the bishops of St Davids in Pembrokeshire. The castle was destroyed in 1192, but rebuilt in the late 13th century.

The guidebook by C.A. Ralegh Radford contains a standard history, followed by a description divided into sub-sections. A plan of the castle was placed on the centre pages.