Framlingham Castle: the towers

IMG_7862

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9703

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

The gateway to Framlingham Castle enters through the base of Tower 1.

IMG_7865

Framlingham Castle, Towers 1-6 (from right to left) © David Gill

IMG_7863

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9728

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7864

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

On the eastern side are Towers 4, 5, and 6.

IMG_7873

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9706

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7874

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_0271

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9710

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9723

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7870

Framlingham Castle, Towers 7-11 (from right to left) © David Gill

IMG_7875

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9719

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_7877

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9713

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9718

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9717

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

The present descent from the wall walkway is through Tower 10.

IMG_7872

Framlingham Castle, Towers 9-13 (from right to left) © David Gill

IMG_0529

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

Access to the wall walkway is through Tower 11.

IMG_7876

Framlingham Castle, Towers 1, 13 and 12 (from left to right) © David Gill

IMG_9693

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

IMG_9730

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

Framlingham Castle: Tudor bridge

IMG_0571

Framlingham Castle © David Gill

A 16th century bridge provided access from the inner court to the garden on the other side of the ditch in the outer bailey. The bridge was constructed from stone and brick.

Access was adjacent to Tower 7.

IMG_0566

Framlingham Castle, Tudor bridge © David Gill

Brougham Castle: Latin Inscription

IMG_9847

Latin inscription, Brougham Castle © David Gill

The 13th century keep of Brougham Castle, Cumbria incorporates reused masonry from the Roman fort (Brocavum). A Latin funerary inscription is built into the ceiling of the second floor (RIB 787). The person named is Tittus M[..] who died around the age of 32 (‘[pl]us minus’). The monument was set up by his brother.

Framlingham Castle: coat of arms

Framlingham_gate

Framlingham Castle; left © David Gill; right, 1965

The cover of the MPBW Guidebook to Framlingham Castle in Suffolk bears the coat of arms of the Howards that is located over the main gateway (Tower 1) that faces the town. This entrance was rebuilt in the early 16th century, probably after 1513, by Thomas Howard, Second Duke of Norfolk.

The Tudor rose can be noted under the rear right paw of the right-hand lion.

Remember to have fun at Framlingham Castle

IMG_0269

Framlingham Castle, September 2017 © David Gill

The once peaceful surroundings of Framlingham Castle are a little bit of Suffolk’s heritage. English Heritage has installed a slide (‘Time Tunnel’) inside the walls as part of its visitor improvements.

IMG_0274

Framlingham Castle, September 2017 © David Gill

IMG_0272

Framlingham Castle, September 2017 © David Gill

IMG_0284

Framlingham Castle, September 2017 © David Gill

In case you want to remember the castle as it was in previous years, here is a reminder:

Fram_7870

Framlingham Castle, 2015 © David Gill

Framlingham Castle: Ministry sign removed

IMG_8018

Framlingham Castle, 2015 © David Gill

The walk around the walls of Framlingham Castle provide some wonderful views of the castle. There is a strict route to help visitors enjoy the route. A simple and stylish Ministry of Works sign indicated ‘No Exit’ at the entry point. In fact most people probably never noticed it as they made their way along the walls. However this sign has now been removed.

An enquiry to the castle team revealed that the sign did not fit current English Heritage branding and had been removed. In its place rather makeshift and flimsy signs had been printed on A4.

Dirleton: the Ruthven Lodging

IMG_2572

Dirleton Castle, the Ruthven Lodging © David Gill

The Ruthven Lodging is located on the south side of the main courtyard, and to the west of the main gatehouse. It was constructed by the Ruthven family after they acquired the castle in the early 16th century.

IMG_2571

Dirleton Castle, the Ruthven Lodging © David Gill

IMG_2602-Edit

Dirleton Castle © David Gill