Tantallon Castle: lean-to buildings

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Tantallon Castle © David Gill

The inside of the curtain-wall at Tantallon Castle has a series of horizontal sockets. The Ministry sign helpfully explains them as the traces of likely lean-to buildings. The Historic Scotland guidebook by Chris Tabraham suggests the possibility that they are the remains of the ‘munition houss’ mentioned in 1566.

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Tantallon Castle © David Gill

Dirleton Castle: polite request

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

Dirleton Castle is set in landscaped grounds. Visitors are invited to keep off the banks, and to use the paths and stairways to visit the remains. This avoids unsightly tracks appearing on the slopes.

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

Safety notices at Tantallon Castle

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Tantallon Castle and Bass Rock © David Gill

The battlements at Tantallon Castle provide a wonderful platform for looking out towards Bass Rock and the mouth of the Firth of Forth. There are warning signs not to go to cross the safety fencing.

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Tantallon Castle © David Gill

The lower part of the castle is adjacent to some sheer drops and there are further warning signs.

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Tantallon Castle and Bass Rock © David Gill

Warkworth Castle: wine cellar

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

The keep of Warkworth Castle in Northumberland contains two wine cellars on the ground floor of the east side of the building. The most southerly connected to the Great Hall above by a flight of stairs.

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

 

Dumbarton Castle: Spur Battery

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Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

The Spur Battery at Dumbarton Castle was constructed about 1680. It lies to the west of the Governor’s House. The Spur Battery was intended to cover the southern approach to the castle.

Cadw Visitor Figures for 2015

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Tretower Court © David Gill

The 2015 visitor figures for Cadw sites are now available (for 2014 see here). (2014 numbers are in brackets.)

  1. Conwy Castle: 204,172  (184,758)
  2. Caernarfon Castle: 195,352 (175,216)
  3. Caerphilly Castle: 93,421 (107,887)
  4. Harlech Castle: 89,038  (75,512)
  5. Beaumaris Castle: 82,368 (86,854)
  6. Tintern Abbey: 70,808 (67,520)
  7. Castell Coch: 69,004 (69,418)
  8. Raglan Castle: 66,058 (59,385)
  9. Caerleon Roman Baths and Amphitheatre: 60,192 (55,977)
  10. Chepstow Castle: 59,463 (56,976)
  11. Criccieth Castle: 45,715  (43,528)
  12. Kidwelly Castle: 31,686 (29,359)
  13. St David’s Bishop’s Palace: 24,308 (24,646)
  14. Blaenavon Ironworks: 29,107 (22,467)
  15. Rhuddlan Castle: 25,872 (20,701)
  16. Plas Mawr: 23,658 (24,738)
  17. Carreg Cennen Castle: 23,345  (21,776)
  18. Cilgerran Castle: 19,416  (17,894)
  19. Laugharne Castle: 12,209  (15,807)
  20. Tretower Castle and Court: 13,587  (11,537)
  21. Denbigh Castle: 10,154 (12,584)
  22. Valle Crucis Abbey: 7,355  (8,117)
  23. White Castle: 7,682 (8,603)
  24. Oxwich Castle: 6,336  (6,070)
  25. Strata Florida Abbey: 5,280 (6,391)
  26. Dolwyddelan Castle: 4,645  (5,768)
  27. Lamphey Bishop’s Palace: 3,220  (2,856)
  28. Rug Chapel: 2,674 (3,387)
  29. Weobley Castle: 2,071  (2,495)
  30. Margam Stones Museum: 139  (438)