Thetford: guidebooks

Thetford_MPBW

1956 (repr. 1970)

The Cluniac priory at Thetford was placed in State Guardianship in 1932. F.J.E. Raby prepared the first official guide in 1935. This was expanded by P.K. Baillie Reynolds (1956). The pair also prepared the guidebooks for Castle Acre Priory and Framlingham Castle.

The Thetford guide consists of three pages of History, followed by six pages of description. A plan of the priory was placed in the middle pages.

Thetford_EH

1984 (repr. 1989; orig. 1979)

In 1979 the DOE guidebook was expanded to include a section on the Warren Lodge outside Thetford. S.E. Rigold prepared the new section on the lodge. In 1984 this booklet evolved into the English Heritage guide with black and white photographs and plans. David Sherlock had a section on the Church of the Canons of the Holy Sepulchre (with plan), and Rigold on the lodge.

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Thetford Warren Lodge © David Gill

Spring at Ickworth

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Ickworth © David Gill

Spring has arrived at NT Ickworth. New-born lambs abound, and there are stunning lines of tulips in the walled garden, and swathes of daffodils in front of the rotunda. The woodpeckers were active and added to the atmosphere.

Ipswich, Wet Dock

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Ipswich Marina © David Gill

The port of Ipswich can be traced back to the Anglo-Saxon period. Traces of the medieval town peep through, notably the medieval churches such as St Clement that lies to the north of present marina. The Isaac Lord building (now a quayside pub) is a former 17th or 18th century brick maltings with kiln.

The Wet Dock, designed by H.R. Palmer, was opened in 1842. A number of warehouses associated with this phase can still be seen. Palmer also designed the dock facilities at Port Talbot and Neath in South Wales, and at Penzance in Cornwall.

The commercial Wet Dock is now largely used as a marina.

See also here.

Lincluden Collegiate Church: Princess Margaret

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Lincluden, tomb of Princess Margaret © David Gill

Lincluden Collegiate Church lies on the northern side of Dumfries and is in the care of Historic Scotland (HES). The tomb of princess Margaret (b. before 1373; d. 1450/51) [ODNB], daughter of king Robert III (d. 1406) [ODNB] and widow of Archibald, 4th Earl of Douglas (c. 1369-1424) [ODNB], is located in the choir of the church. Her brother was king James I of Scotland (1394-1437) [ODNB].

Ruthwell Cross

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Ruthwell Cross © David Gill

The Ruthwell Cross now stands in a specially constructed apse (1887) in Ruthwell Parish Church (although it is in the care of Historic Scotland). It is some 5.7 m in height, and dates to the early 8th century.

The inscribed text includes sections of The Dream of the Rood linked to Caedmon.

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Ruthwell Cross © David Gill

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Ruthwell Cross © David Gill

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Ruthwell Cross © David Gill

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Ruthwell Cross © David Gill

The cross stood at the entrance to the Manse from 1823 to 1887 (when it was placed in the church).

Sweetheart Abbey: Chapter House

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Sweetheart Abbey © David Gill

The chapter house at Sweetheart Abbey lies on the east side of the cloister adjacent to the library and sacristry. The benches around the outer edge of the chapter house remain in places.

The window that dominates the east wall appears to have been part of the refectory in the south range of buildings. It was then reused in the east wall of the parish church for New Abbey village that was built in 1731 along the south wall of the abbey nave. The window was placed in the chapter house in 1877 when the parish church was demolished.

The abbey was placed in State guardianship in 1928.

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Sweetheart Abbey, Chapter House © David Gill

Lanercost Priory: tombs

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Lanercost Priory © David Gill

Some of the most important tombs at Lanercost are found in the eastern part of the priory church. This tomb in the north transept appears to date from the late 14th century and probably was for a member of the Dacre family. The sign suggests that more recent visitors to the site were in the habit of adding their initials or names to the monument.

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Tomb in north transepct, Lanercost Priory © David Gill