Dumbarton Castle: Custodian’s Office

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Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

We may now think of staff at heritage sites being managers, but in the days of the Ministry they were clearly seen as Custodians (see also Sweetheart Abbey). Three signs at Dumbarton Castle on the north side of the Clyde retain the old terminology. Notice the omission of the apostrophe in one of the signs, as well as the different styles of arrow directing visitors to where they can obtain tickets. There is also the inclusion of the polite, ‘Please obtain …’.

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Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

Outside the present ticket office is a slightly more recent sign, reflecting the way that the custodian’s office is not only where tickets can be obtained, but where other items can now be purchased.

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Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

Clyde heritage on the Bosphorus

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Sarayburnu on the Bosphorus © David Gill

The Sarayburnu was used on the Bosphorus route until 1984 when she was withdrawn from service. She was built by Fairfield in Govan, and launched in 1910. She was originally owned by the Bosphorus Steam Navigation Company, and took the name Sarayburnu in 1952 when she was taken over by Denizcilik Banasi T.A.O.

Heritage Scaffolding

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Signage at Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

The Governor’s House at Dumbarton Castle was in a state of restoration during a visit in 2015. But Historic Scotland had provided an information panel about the use of scaffolding over time.

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Entrance to King George’s Battery at Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

King George’s Battery was created in 1735.

Dumbarton Castle: Portcullis Gate

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Portcullis Arch, Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

The Portcullis Arch provides access from the lower part of Dumbarton Castle. It probably dates from the 14th century.

The castle is built next to the Clyde.

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Portcullis Arch, Dumbarton Castle © David Gill