Academic Journals: Journal of the History of Collecting

Journal Summary: The Journal of the History of Collections is dedicated to providing the clearest insight into all aspects of collecting activity. For centuries collecting has been the pursuit of princes and apothecaries, scholars and amatuers alike. Only recently, however, has the study of collections and their collectors become the subject of great multidisciplinary interest. The range of the Journal of the History of Collections embraces the contents of collections, the processes which initiated their formation, and the circumstances of the collectors themselves. As well as publishing original papers, the Journal includes listings of forthcoming events, conferences, and reviews of relevant publications and exhibitions, making it the most comprehensive source available on a subject of increasing interest and study.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Website: https://academic.oup.com/jhc

Access: Subscription; some open access

Journal Type: Academic peer-reviewed

Remembering Brian Shefton

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2016

A series of essays on objects in the Shefton collection, part of the Great North Museum in Newcastle upon Tyne, arrived this week. There are 14 essays that explore the Greek and Etruscan objects brought together by Shefton.

My own essay was on an early example of an Attic black-glossed bosal [a name invented by Sir John Beazley for shapes he recognised in Bol[ogna] and Sal[onika]] that had once formed part of the Nostell Priory collection in Yorkshire.

This publication coincides with my the electronic publication of my memoir in Shefton that appeared in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 

  • ‘The Nostell Priory bolsal’, in J. Boardman, A. Parkin, and S. Waite (eds.), On the Fascination of Objects: Greek and Etruscan Art in the Shefton Collection (Oxford: Oxbow, 2016), 95-106.
  • ‘Shefton, Brian Benjamin (1919–2012)’, in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). [online]

Fitzwilliam Museum: Bicentenary

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Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge © David Gill

In 1816 Viscount Fitzwilliam made a spectacular bequest to the University of Cambridge and this led directly to the establishment of a museum that now bears his name (“Cambridge University’s Fitzwilliam Museum marks 200 years“, BBC News, January 2, 2016). The building that now holds the collections opened in 1848.

My own interest is in the classical collections: from the sculptures donated by Dr John Disney (‘the Disney Marbles’) and E. D. Clarke; the figure-decorated pottery that once formed part of the collection of Colonel William M. Leake; the prehistoric collections derived from excavations by the British School at Athens on Crete (Palaikastro) and Melos (Phylakopi); and the bronzes brought together by Dr Winifred Lamb.

 

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