Academic journals: Anthropological Journal of European Cultures (AJEC)

Journal summary: Published since 1990, Anthropological Journal of European Cultures (AJEC) engages with current debates and innovative research agendas addressing the social and cultural transformations of contemporary European societies. The journal serves as an important forum for ethnographic research in and on Europe, which in this context is not defined narrowly as a geopolitical entity but rather as a meaningful cultural construction in people’s lives, which both legitimates political power and calls forth practices of resistance and subversion. By presenting both new field studies and theoretical reflections on the history and politics of studying culture in Europe anthropologically, AJEC encompasses different academic traditions of engaging with its subject, from social and cultural anthropology to European ethnology and empirische Kulturwissenschaften.
In addition to the thematic focus of each issue, which has characterised the journal from its inception, AJEC now also carries individual articles on other topics addressing aspects of social and cultural transformations in contemporary Europe from an ethnographically grounded anthropological perspective. All such contributions are peer reviewed. Each issue also includes book reviews and reports on major current research programmes.

Publisher: Berghahn

Website: https://www.berghahnjournals.com/view/journals/ajec/ajec-overview.xml

Access: Subscription; some open-access articles

Journal type: Academic peer-reviewed

Imperial Measurements to Return

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Standard Measurements at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich © David Gill

It has been announced today that, as part of the preparation for Brexit, the UK will be jettisoning metric measurements and returning to the ‘Imperial’ measurements of inches, feet and yards. This adventurous initiative has been put in place to ensure that UK citizens have a unique British perspective on distance and location.

This move is likely to prove a challenge to those under 60 who have been brought up on millimetres, metres and kilometres. However older citizens may feel reassurance from this reintroduction. It also needs to be remembered that the UK continues to measure longer distances in miles and speeds in miles per hour. It is hoped that the move will standardise the units of measurement.

It is unclear if petrol stations will be required to sell fuel in gallons rather than litres, or that car dealerships will need to show fuel consumption in miles per gallon (as opposed to kilometres per litre).

One of the additional benefits of this change is the likely improvement in mental numeracy as calculators on phones and tablets will not readily convert to and from a non-metric system.

A short ceremony to anticipate the forthcoming legislation will be conducted by the Greenwich meridian line with the slogan, “Now is the time to put feet back”.

The necessary process will not be contained within the Great Repeal Bill, though it is understood that a series of possible names are under active consideration, among them the Large Yard Bill.

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