World’s First Twinned Archaeological Sites

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Grime’s Graves © David Gill

Last night (14 July 2016) we attended a ceremony to celebrate the World’s First Twinned Archaeological Sites: Grime’s Graves in Norfolk and the Hoshikuso Obsidian Mines in Japan. There was a warm welcome from the Mayor of Thetford.

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Grime’s Graves © David Gill

We were given a tour of one of the pits, and then a walk round part of the site to Canon Greenwell’s Pit (not open to the public).

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Grime’s Graves, Canon Greenwell’s Pit © David Gill

This was followed by speeches, and a signing ceremony between the two archaeological sites.

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Grime’s Graves © David Gill
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Grime’s Graves © David Gill

The party of Obsidian Ambassadors then sang to us, followed by further music suited to a perfect summer evening.

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Grime’s Graves © David Gill

The Walls of Norwich

The Boom Towers on Carrow Bridge
The Boom Towers by Carrow Bridge (2015)

The tour of the medieval walls of Norwich was extremely instructive. We started at the Boom Towers adjacent to Carrow Bridge. These structures allowed a chain to be raised to restrict river traffic along the Wensum (although the position of the chain and winding mechanisms was not immediately clear). The damage to the tower since 1934 can be seen quite clearly here.

Tower on south side of Norwich (2015)
The Black Tower on south side of Norwich (2015)

We climbed up the hill from the river inspecting the well preserved walls and towers along the south side. For an image of the tower in the 1930s see here.

Detail of tower on south side of Norwich (2015)
Detail of the Black Tower on south side of Norwich (2015)

Notice the wall walk and the way that the staircase is mounted into the wall.

Terminal bastion (2015)
Terminal bastion or Oak Street Tower (2015)

We crossed the river to inspect this terminal bastion adjacent to the river in the northern part of the circuit.

Further details about the medieval walls of Norwich can be found here. A photographic record of the walls can be found here.

Signs and the Walls of Norwich

Norwich City Wall
Norwich: The Old City Wall (2015)

A group of us walked the line of the city wall of Norwich today. Some of the sections are well preserved, and the line is marked out along pavements and even in the middle of one of the roundabouts. We came across a number of metal plaques that noted ‘This forms part of the old city wall built during the 13th-14th centuries’.

One of the suggestions is that they were placed on the wall by the Office of Works either in the early part of the 20th century or in the 1930s.

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