Brochs in State Guardianship

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Dun Beag, Skye © David Gill

Brochs are an important part of the archaeological landscape. Several have been placed in State Guardianship in Scotland.

Shetland: Clickimin Broch; Mousa Broch

Orkney: Broch of Gurness; Midhowe Broch [Guidebook: HES]

Gurness_HS

1993 (rev. ed. 2008)

Western Lewis: Dun Carloway

Skye: Dun Beag

Mainland: Glenelg Brochs (Dun Telve, Dun Troddan)

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Glenelg © David Gill

Sutherland: Dun DornaigilCarn Liath

Scottish Borders: Edin’s Hall

 

Craigmillar Castle: guidebook

Craigmillar_blue

1954 (4th impress. 1970)

Craigmillar Castle, to the south-east of Edinburgh, was placed in State Guardianship in 1946. W. Douglas Simpson prepared the official guidebook in 1954. At the heart of the castle is the tower house, constructed after 1374 by Sir Simon Preston of Gorton. Queen Mary used the castle as her residence after the murder of Rizzio in 1566.

The guidebook is divided into description and (a short) history. A plan of the castle, and detail of the floors is provided in the centre pages.

Hermitage Castle: guidebooks

Hermitage_cas_blue

1957 (5th impress. 1974)

Hermitage Castle and the adjacent chapel were placed in State Guardianship in 1930. The ‘blue’ guide was prepared by W. Douglas Simpson. There is a short history indicating that the castle was founded by 1300. It was captured by Sir William Douglas in 1338. There is then a description with a series of black and white photographs, and a ground floor plan.

A short description of Hermitage Chapel, settled by brother William from Kelso. The guide closes with a section on Ballad Lore, and the account of Lord Soulis.

Hermitage_cas_HS

1982 (3rd ed. 1987)

Simpson’s blue guide continued into the period of Historic Scotland. The text is almost identical. The introduction becomes ‘Renouned among Border fortresses’. The history is turned into ‘The strength of Liddesdale’; the seal of William Douglas that served on the cover of the blue guide is inserted in the text.  The description became ‘Grim indeed’. Among the photographs is one from the air derived from the Royal Commission. The plan that appears in the double pages of the blue guide appears inside the back cover, although the scale is reproduced in metres. The section on Ballad Lore is included along with a portrait of Sir Walter Scott with Hermitage Castle in the background.

The section on the chapel includes photographs as well as a plan and restoration made in 1900.

This guide included a family tree of the Douglases (and points to other family castles, namely Threave, Tantallon, and Aberdour) and one of Hepburn (with other castles, Crichton, Hailes, Huntly; Spynie Palace; St Andrews Cathedral). There are portraits of James Hepburn, 4th Early of Bothwell, and his second wife, Mary Queen of Scots. (The portrait of Mary in the HS guide uses the portrait in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery.)

Note the different colours used for ‘Hermitage’ and ‘Castle’.

Hermitage_ca_HS_new

A new Historic Scotland ‘Official Souvenir Guide’ was prepared by Chris Tabraham. This starts with a Guided Tour, followed by the History. There is mention of a possible deer park. No plan is included although a drawing of the castle from the air helps to orientate the visitor.

Warkworth Hermitage: Ministry sign

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Warkworth Hermitage © David Gill

Warkworth Hermitage was placed in State Guardianship in 1923. The Ministry of Works guardianship sign still stands. (For another in Northumberland, see Chesterholm Roman Milestone).

Reculver: guidebooks

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Reculver © David Gill

The Saxon Shore fort of Reculver in Kent is in the care of English Heritage. Parts of the Roman fort has been eroded into the sea. In the 7th century the fort became the site for the foundation of an Anglo-Saxon minster. The site was placed in Site Guardianship in 1950.

Reculver_DOE

Stuart E. Rigold wrote a short guide to the site in 1971. This followed the format of the DOE concertina card guides (see also Hardknott Roman fort; Hetty Pegler’s Tump). There are 6 columns of text (the fort, the minster) on one side (with a small plan of the fort and church), a series of images including a plan of the 7th-15th century ecclesiastical structures.

Richborough_EH

(2012)

The present English Heritage guide by Tony Wilmott covers the two Saxon Shore forts in Kent, Reculver and Richborough.

Nunney Castle: Guidebook

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1957 (6th impress. with amendments, 1967)

Nunney Castle in Somerset was placed in State Guardianship in 1926. The guidebook was prepared by Stuart Rigold (1957); it remained in print until 1977. The guidebook takes the usual format of History followed by Description with a single plan in text. There are a number of black and white illustrations including a drawing of the back by S. and N. Buck.

Eynsford Castle: Guidebook

Eynsford_MPBW

1964 (3rd impress. with amendments 1965)

Eynford Castle in Kent was placed in State Guardianship in 1948. The ruins were consolidated and Stuart Rigold prepared a guidebook (1964). This consisted of the standard format of History followed by Description. There were black and white photographs with a fold-out plan in the back.

The design is based on the seal of William de Eynsford III in Christ Church, Canterbury.

Eynsford_DOE

1964 (7th impress. 1974)

This guidebook was amended in 1974, and appeared as the English Heritage guide for the site in 1984. One of the changes made was the layout with bold sub-headings for different parts of the castle.