Grime’s Graves: Young People’s Guide

MPBW_Grimes_Child_cov

1964

The neolithic mines at Grime’s Graves are in the care of English Heritage. Barbara Green prepared the Young People’s Guide to Grime’s Graves (1964), in parallel to the souvenir guide to the site. The cover is by Alan Sorrell, and the guide was printed by Brown Knight & Truscott Ltd., London and Tonbridge.

The guide poses a two questions before addressing wider questions:

  • why were the mines dug?
  • what was the flint used for?
  • mining at Grime’s Graves
  • Exploring the mines (‘… it is often necessary to wriggle on one’s stomach’).

There is little in the text to make it more accessible for the younger visitor.

Inside the cover is a note: ‘Visitors wishing to crawl along the galleries are advised to wear old clothes and take an electric torch’. Those galleries are now closed to the public.

My copy was a handwritten note of the opening times on the back cover. The site was open until 7.00 pm from May to September (5.30 pm, March, April, October; 4.00 pm, November – February).

North Elmham Chapel

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North Elmham Chapel © David Gill

In the late Anglo-Saxon period North Elmham was a focal point for the Bishops of East Anglia. The bishopric was moved to Thetford in 1071.

Bishop Herbert de Losinga [ODNB] founded a church, after 1091, on the site of the earlier Anglo-Saxon cathedral. At some point after 1388 Bishop Henry le Despencer turned the former chapel into a castle. Part of the walls within the inner moat can be seen to the right of the chapel’s apse.

The chapel is now in the care of English Heritage.

The MPBW published a short paper guide by S.E. Rigold (1960) using the site’s then title of ‘North Elmham Saxon Cathedral’.

North_Elmham

1960 (repr. 1966)

Celebrating 100 Years of Guides to the National Heritage Collection

StBotolph_OW

1917

2017 marks the centenary of the first guidebooks to what can now be termed the National Heritage Collection. One of the first was written by Sir Charles Peers on St Botolph’s Priory in Colchester and now in the care of English Heritage. The guidebook was reissued as a ‘blue’ guide in 1964.

The 1917 guide include a fold-out plan of the priory inside the back cover. This was prepared by E. Dace Brown in July 1916. The guide was divided into three sections: The Augustinian Rule; History of St Botolph’s Priory; and The Priory Buildings.

Guidebooks to Orford Castle

DOE_Orford

1964 (2nd impress. 1975)

Orford Castle was placed in the care of the Ministry of Works in 1962. The first guidebook was prepared by R. Allen Brown (1964) with a second impression in 1975. This followed the standard format to the ‘blue’ guides with history and description. The foldout plan at the back provided a section through the castle, and six plans of the different floors.

EH_Orford_early

1964 (1982; English Heritage 1988; repr. 1975)

This became the English Heritage guidebook. The plans and section were incorporated in the text.

EH_Framlingham_Orford

1988

A combined guidebook with Framlingham Castle followed. This was prepared by Derek Renn (1988). This contained colour illustrations and plans. It followed the format of a tour followed by a history of the castles.

EH_Orford_new

2003 (rev. 2011; repr. 2013)

The present guidebook is by John Rhodes (2003). It contains a tour of the castle followed by a history.

Guidebooks for Audley End

Audley End

Audley End (1955)

The original Ministry of Works guidebook for Audley End in Essex was by Bryan H. St John O’Neil (1950). A third edition appeared in 1958, and this formed the basis of the (anonymous) Ministry of Public Buildings and Works Official Guidebook.

audley_end_mpbw

1958 (3rd ed; 1967, 5th impress.)

audley_end_eh_white

1984 (2nd ed. 1991)

English Heritage replaced this guide with a new one by P.J. Drury and I.R. Gow (1984; 2nd ed. 1991). This had the standard ‘white’ cover with red title.

audley_end_eh_col

1997 (rev. 2002; rev. 2005; repr. 2007)

This was replaced in 1997 by a large format colour guide. The present English Heritage ‘red’ guide is by Paul Drury (2010).

audley_end_eh_red

2010 (rev. repr. 2011)

Carreg Coetan Arthur Burial Chamber

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Carreg Coetan Arthur © David Gill

The burial chamber of Carreg Coetan Arthur lies on the east side of Newport in Pembrokeshire. The monument is in the care of Cadw. It was excavated in 1979 and 1980.

A Cadw guide was prepared by J.B. Hilling (1992). This is omitted from the earlier list of Cadw guides to burial chambers in Wales.

Silchester: Guidebook

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2016

English Heritage has issued a guidebook written by Professor Michael Fulford, excavator of the Roman town (2016). It replaces a series of earlier guides to the town.

Inside the front cover is a foldout plan indicating walking routes around the site. Inside the back is a plan of the Roman town and earlier Iron Age defences.

The guidebook includes a tour of the site, and is followed by a history. There are special features on: religion; the water supply and the force pump; dogs; diet; industry; the Ogham stone; the Victorian rubbish pit; and the Silchester collection at Reading Museum.