Roman roads in State Guardianship

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Wheeldale Moor Roman Road © David Gill

The construction of roads transformed the landscape of Britain. Yet only a limited number of fragments have been placed in State Guardianship. One of the most dramatic sections is a stretch that crosses Wheeldale Moor in North Yorkshire.

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Wheeldale Moor Roman Road © David Gill

A stretch of Dere Street near Soutra in Scotland has been preserved. This passed through Corbridge and Newstead.

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Dere Street © David Gill
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Dere Street near Soutra Aisle © David Gill

Further south Dere Street crossed the river Tees at Piercebridge and remains of the bridge have been found.

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Piercebridge © David Gill

A Roman milestone on the Stanegate near the fort of Vindolanda was placed in Guardianship.

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Vindolanda, Roman milestone © David Gill

 

Outlander and heritage tourism

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Doune Castle © David Gill

The Outlander series of books and TV series is having an impact on visitor numbers at heritage sites in Scotland (“Outlander tourism effect a ‘double edged sword’“, BBC News 15 February 2020). Doune Castle is reported to have a 200 per cent increase, rising from 38,000 in 2013 to 142,000 in 2008. It is now the fifth most popular Historic Environment Scotland site.

Culloden, managed by the National Trust for Scotland, has also seen a large increase in visitor numbers to over 213,000 in 2018.

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Source for Data: ALVA

MacLellan’s Castle: the ‘Laird’s Lug’

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MacLellan’s Castle © David Gill

The Laird’s Lug in MacLellan’s Castle is located behind the fireplace in the main hall and would allow conversations to be overheard.

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MacLellan’s Castle © David Gill
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MacLellan’s Castle, Great Hall © David Gill
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MacLellan’s Castle © David Gill

Cardoness and Carsluith Castles: guidebooks

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1996 (repr. 2009)

The combined guidebook for Cardoness and Carsluith Castles was published in 1996. It was prepared by Doreen Grove. Cardoness has sections on the story, short tour, and architecture of the castle; Carsluith just has two sections, the story and the architecture.

The revised guide was by Adrian Cox and Doreen Grove. There is some overlap, e.g. ‘The story of Cardoness Castle’ and ‘The Lordship of Cardoness’; the McCullochs of Cardoness. Some of the themes are continued, e.g. ‘The castle as a defence’, and ‘The castle as a residence’.

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2013

Dryburgh Abbey: choir

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

The choir rested below the central tower. To the east was the high altar, and to the south the night stair to the dorter. The north-east pier remains in the remains of the north transpet. IMG_2645-Edit-Edit

Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

Cambuskenneth Abbey: guidebook

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1950 (repr. 1973)

Cambuskenneth Abbey, near Stirling, was founded in 1147.

The remains of the abbey were placed in State Guardianship in 1908. Stewart Cruden prepared the first guidebook in 1950; a second edition appeared in 1978. It consists of two parts: history and description. A plan is placed on the centre pages.