Dirleton Castle: features in the Ruthven lodging

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

The first floor of the Ruthven lodging at Dirleton Castle is accessed by a circular staircase. Immediately inside is a ‘Wall cupboard once fitted with shelves’.

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

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Dirleton Castle © David Gill

Inchcolm Abbey: guidebooks

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1937 (2nd ed. 1950)

Inchcolm Abbey was placed in State Guardianship in 1924. The remains was conserved by J. Wilson Paterson, the architect in charge of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings in Scotland.  Paterson prepared the first guidebook in 1937; a second edition was published in 1950. It includes a fold-out plan of the abbey, as well as a series of evolving plans.

The foundation was Augustinian, and was probably linked to Scone or St Andrews. It became an abbey in 1235.

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1989 (rev. ed. 1998)

A new guidebook (‘Official Souvenir Guide’) was prepared by Richard Fawcett, David McRoberts and Fiona Stewart in 1989 and revised for Historic Scotland in 1998. This starts with a guided tour, and followed by ‘The story of Inchcolm Abbey and Island’. The history is taken up to the Second World War with the defence of the First of Forth.

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2011

A new format souvenir guide was prepared by Kirsty Owen.

New Abbey Cornmill: privacy

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New Abbey Cornmill © David Gill

New Abbey Cornmill retains a number of Ministry style signs (e.g. entrance and exit, video room). They include two ‘private’ signs, one external and one internal: compare similar signs from Hadrian’s Wall, and a National Trust example from Mottistone.

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New Abbey Cornmill © David Gill

Whithorn: museum signs

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Whithorn Museum © David Gill

We have commented on the wonderful Historic Scotland museum at Whithorn. The old Ministry sign is displayed in addition to the new HES information board.

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Whithorn Museum © David Gill

Above the door is an inscription in both Latin and English dating to 1730 recording the benefaction of both the parish and town (donis parochiae et urbis structa).

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Whithorn Museum, inscription © David Gill

Dundrennan Abbey: night-stairs and dorter

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

The site of the night stairs from the dorter at Dundrennan Abbey are located in the south transept.

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

The dorter was located above the chapter house, and remains of one of the windows can be seen in the upper section.

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

The reredorter was located at the southern end of the range.

Melrose Abbey: Dorter

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The dorter lay on the east side of the cloister, above the chapter house. The night stairs to it were in the north transept of the abbey church. The dorter was accessed through a round doorway.

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Melrose Abbey, doorway to dorter © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey, east range with doorway to night stairs © David Gill

The day stairs to the dorter lay in the north-east corner of the cloister, on the south side of the dorter. Note the roof line of the dorter on the exterior of the north transept of the church.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The reredorter lay on the east side of the dorter.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

Crossraguel Abbey: private houses

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Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

A series of five houses are located in the south court of Crossraguel Abbey. They probably date to the 15th century.

The 1589 quotation is from John Vaus, who was appointed commendator (in the period following the Reformation). ‘Pur men’ are ‘poor men’.

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Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill