Planning changes in England

Planning for the FutureThe Government has launched a consultation on reforms of the planning system in England. The “Planning for the Future” consultation has at its heart proposals to radically streamline and modernise the planning process, claiming it will bring a new focus on design and sustainability, improve the system of developer contributions to infrastructure, and ensure more land is available for development in a speedier fashion than has previously been the case.  The heritage sector has been anticipating the announcement, and will need to look both quickly and closely at the implications for both protected and unprotected historic buildings and sites, the historic character of places, archaeology within the development control process, and much wider issues around sustainability, design/build quality and use of appropriate materials.  It will also need to pitch its views and concerns carefully in a post-covid world where getting the economy moving again and getting Britain building is the Government’s current dual-toned mantra.

In previous planning and development policy changes at a national level, The National Trust has been in a lead role campaigning to ensure that heritage remains a key consideration, alongside other organisations such as the coalition of heritage NGOs represented by The Heritage Alliance’s Spatial Planning Advocacy Group.  With current challenges within heritage organisations as a result of the pandemic this may be more difficult, and it will be ever more important for the sector to combine its efforts to get its reasoned voice heard – showing where heritage can clearly contribute for the long term in creating, sustaining and improving places and communities.

Crossraguel Abbey: private houses

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Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

A series of five houses are located in the south court of Crossraguel Abbey. They probably date to the 15th century.

The 1589 quotation is from John Vaus, who was appointed commendator (in the period following the Reformation). ‘Pur men’ are ‘poor men’.

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Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

Great Yarmouth Row Houses: leaflet

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1965

The 17th century rows of housing at Great Yarmouth were badly damaged by bombing during the Second World War. Part of the Old Merchant’s House on South Quay was purchased by the Great Yarmouth Historical Buildings Company in 1908. The structure was damaged by enemy action and was restored by the Ministry of Works after it took over responsibility in 1949. The house and Row 111 houses are now in the care of English Heritage.

AIR RAID DAMAGE IN GREAT BRITAIN DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR
AIR RAID DAMAGE IN GREAT BRITAIN DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR© IWM (H 8803)

The MPBW card guide predates the Beeching cuts to the railway. Note that there are three stations shown on the map of Great Yarmouth: Southdown station is now closed. Beach Station had been closed to passengers in 1959.

The interior of the card provides additional information about the rows and illustrates some of the finds.

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