Lindisfarne Priory: pantry

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Lindisfarne Priory © David Gill

The ‘pantry’ is located in the west range of Lindisfarne Priory. The current English Heritage guidebook defines it on the plan as a cellar, and suggests that the three rooms were created in the middle of the 14th century.

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Lindisfarne Priory © David Gill

Brochs in State Guardianship

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Dun Beag, Skye © David Gill

Brochs are an important part of the archaeological landscape. Several have been placed in State Guardianship in Scotland.

Shetland: Clickimin Broch; Mousa Broch

Orkney: Broch of Gurness; Midhowe Broch [Guidebook: HES]

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1993 (rev. ed. 2008)

Western Lewis: Dun Carloway

Skye: Dun Beag

Mainland: Glenelg Brochs (Dun Telve, Dun Troddan)

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Glenelg © David Gill

Sutherland: Dun DornaigilCarn Liath

Scottish Borders: Edin’s Hall

 

Kirkwall: guidebook to the palaces

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1965 (1969)

The combined guidebook to the Bishop’s Palace and the Earl’s Palace in Kirkwall, Orkney, was prepared by W. Douglas Simpson. Both palaces had been placed in State Guardianship in 1920.

The older Bishop’s Palace was linked to St Magnus’ Cathedral in Orkney. It was constructed in the 12th century.  The Earl’s Palace was constructed by Earl Patrick from 1601; he incorporated the remains of the former Bishop’s Palace that had passed to his father, Earl Robert Stewart in 1568.

The guide contains an Introduction, followed by sections on the Bishop’s Palace and the Earl’s Palace (each with a history followed by a description), then a short bibliography and a glossary. A double-sided fold-out plan inside the back cover provides details for both palaces.

Both palaces now feature in the Historic Scotland guide to the monuments of Orkney by Caroline Wickham-Jones.

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2012

Warnings at Lindisfarne Priory

IMG_2149A number of the Ministry warning signs are still in evidence at Lindisfarne Priory. One is placed on the exterior wall of the west range facing the (modern) churchyard.

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A second is mounted in on one of the ovens in the south range. Similar signs are found at other locations, e.g. Thornton Abbey, Abbey at Bury St Edmunds, Kirkham Priory, Pickering Castle, Hadleigh Castle.

Lindisfarne Priory: brewhouse

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Lindisfarne Priory

The brewhouse at Lindisfarne Priory is located in the south range adjacent to the bakehouse. This part of the priory was constructed in the 1360s. The north-west corner contains a kiln.

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Lindisfarne Priory, brewhouse © David Gill

Leading Visitor Attractions 2016: National Trust for Scotland

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Brodick Castle © David Gill

The numbers for Leading Visitor Attractions in the UK are now available. They include properties in the care of the National Trust for Scotland.

The properties are:

  • no. 133: Culzean Castle & Country Park, 209,710
  • no. 157: Burns Birthplace Museum, 140,528
  • no. 159: Culloden, 139,691
  • no. 181: Inverewe Gardens, 91,576
  • no. 209: Drum Castle, 47,037
  • no. 211: Bannockburn, 45,757
  • no. 213: Falkland Palace, 41,390
  • no. 217: Pitmedden Garden, 33,095
  • no. 233: Brodick Castle and Country Park, 27,896
  • no. 224: Hill House, 26,857
  • no. 230: Gladstones Land, 21,807

Significant increases were seen by Burns Birthplace Museum, Culloden, Inverewe Gardens, Drum Castle, Pitmedden Garden, and Gladstones Land.

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Culloden © David Gill

Remembering migrants

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Ellis Island © David Gill

The luggage in the hall of Ellis Island is a poignant reminder of approximately 12 million migrants who passed through this entry point for the United States in the hope of a better life. It contains the National Museum of Immigration as part of the National Park.