Academic journals: Archeostorie – Journal of Public Archaeology

Journal summary: Archeostorie Journal of Public Archaeology (AJPA) is the open access peer-reviewed scientific journal that provides Italy with an arena to discuss issues such as the management and communication of heritage and the role of archaeology into contemporary society. It produces insightful analyses on significant initiatives aimed at involving the public in archaeological and heritage issues, and bridging the gap between our past and modernity. Furthermore, AJPA wants to encourage scientific debate on Public Archaeology as a discipline, and promote and coordinate related activities. It also aims to promote debate on the future of the profession, and specifically on whether public engagement in archaeological research can contribute to grant archaeologists a different, and hopefully more relevant, role in contemporary society.
AJPA is published once a year, in Spring. Each issue has a Topic of the year session with papers that analyze a specific subject from several points of view, and a Satura Lanx session with papers beyond the main theme.

Publisher: Centre for Public Archaeology Studies ‘Archeostorie’ – cultural association

Website: http://www.archeostoriejpa.eu/

Access: Open access

Journal type: Academic peer-reviewed

Rome, 1944

The British Army on Leave in Italy, June 1944
The British Army on Leave in Italy, June 1944 © IWM (TR 1960)

I was intrigued by this image of ‘Gunner Smith’ of the (British) Royal Artillery and a colleague taking leave in Rome in June 1944 (shortly after the city’s capture earlier that same month). The  photograph was taken by the official war photographer, Captain Tanner.

Getty to return further head to Italy

getty_hades

Terracotta head of Hades found near Morgantina. Source: MiBACT

The J. Paul Getty Museum is to hand over a terracotta head to Italian authorities tomorrow (details on Looting Matters). It will then be put on display in the museum at Aidone, alongside other objects returned from North American collections.

The head’s return raises wider questions about how the Getty acquired material from private collections in the 1980s in spite of the 1970 UNESCO Convention.