Warkworth Castle: Beer Cellar

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Warkworth Castle © David Gill

The beer cellar is located in the western side of the Great Tower of Warkworth Castle (with the wine cellar on the east side). The stairway provides access to the first floor.

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Warkworth Castle © David Gill

Vindolanda: the strong room

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Vindolanda © David Gill

At the heart of the Roman fort at Vindolanda lay the headquarters building. Excavations in 1933 revealed the 4th century phase of the construction. On the south side lay the sacellum and the strong room. This part of the building was indicated by a Ministry of Works sign (see other signage from the site including the milestone).

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Strong Room, Vindolanda © David Gill

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Sacellum and strong room, Vindolanda © David Gill

Warkworth Hermitage: Ministry sign

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Warkworth Hermitage © David Gill

Warkworth Hermitage was placed in State Guardianship in 1923. The Ministry of Works guardianship sign still stands. (For another in Northumberland, see Chesterholm Roman Milestone).

Warkworth Hermitage: landing sign

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Warkworth Hermitage © David Gill

There is limited access to the Hermitage near Warkworth in Northumberland. A rowing boat, crewed by a member of staff from English Heritage, takes you across the river. An official sign reminds you that only official boats are allowed to moor.

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Warkworth Hermitage © David Gill

Nether Largie South Cairn

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Nether Largie South Cairn © David Gill

Nether Largie South Cairn is part of the prehistoric landscape at Kilmartin. It was excavated by Canon Greenwell in 1864. Its first phase appears to belong to the early Neolithic. Two cists were cut into the outer part of the cairn, probably ion the Early Bronze Age.

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Nether Largie Cairns, Kimartin © David Gill

 

Glenluce Abbey: welcome signs

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Glenluce Abbey © David Gill

The Cistcercian abbey at Glenluce was founded around 1192. Other abbeys were located at Melrose (1136), Dundrennan (1142) and Sweetheart (1273). Glenluce was placed in State Guardianship in 1933.

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Glenluce Abbey © David Gill

 

Inchcolm Abbey: guidebooks

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1937 (2nd ed. 1950)

Inchcolm Abbey was placed in State Guardianship in 1924. The remains was conserved by J. Wilson Paterson, the architect in charge of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings in Scotland.  Paterson prepared the first guidebook in 1937; a second edition was published in 1950. It includes a fold-out plan of the abbey, as well as a series of evolving plans.

The foundation was Augustinian, and was probably linked to Scone or St Andrews. It became an abbey in 1235.

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1989 (rev. ed. 1998)

A new guidebook (‘Official Souvenir Guide’) was prepared by Richard Fawcett, David McRoberts and Fiona Stewart in 1989 and revised for Historic Scotland in 1998. This starts with a guided tour, and followed by ‘The story of Inchcolm Abbey and Island’. The history is taken up to the Second World War with the defence of the First of Forth.

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2011

A new format souvenir guide was prepared by Kirsty Owen.