Signs of Chysauster

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Chysauster © David Gill

A single Ministry signpost continues to point the way to Chysauster Ancient Village through the network of small roads in Penwith. It even provides the distance: 2 1/4 miles.

Traces of the original green paint can still be seen against the post.

Binham Priory: church

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Binham Priory from the west © David Gill

The nave of the priory church at Binham remains in use.

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Binham Priory, nave © David Gill

Parts of the south aisle lie outside the present parish church.

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Binham Priory, south aisle and northern part of cloister © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

The choir and presbytery lie to the east of the present parish church and are now in a ruinous state.

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Binham Priory © David Gill

The north and south transepts are clearly marked.

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Binham Priory, south transept © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

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Binham Priory, night stairs in south transept © David Gill

The night stairs are located in the south transept. These led to the dorter.

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Binham Priory © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

The foundations of the late 11th century building are marked out in the north aisle.

The Lady Chapel may have been located on the north side.

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Binham Priory © David Gill

Helmsley Castle: signage

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Helmsley Castle © David Gill

One of the Ministry signs has been used at Helmsley Castle in Yorkshire. Variants of this include ‘Out of Bounds’ (Berwick upon Tweed), ‘No Access Beyond This Point’ (Dundrennan Abbey), ‘Private’ (Hadrian’s Wall; New Abbey Cornmill),  ‘No Admittance Without Ticket’ (Saxtead Green), and ‘No Admittance to Abbey This Way’ (Easby Abbey).

There was a ‘No Exit’ sign at Framlingham Castle.

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Helmsley Castle © David Gill

Cardoness Castle: notice signs

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

The top of Cardoness Castle provides views over the estuary. Visitors are discouraged from trying to get on top of the walls. One points out the danger, the other expressly forbids it.

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

The second reproduces the word ‘Notice’: surely redundant on a sign? And the clear indication that ‘visitors are not allowed on wall top’ is ‘by order’; underneath is an erased  line, ‘Ministry of Works’.

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

Edinburgh Castle: guidebooks

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Fourth edition 1953 (2nd impression 1954)

One of the earliest Ministry guidebooks for properties in Scotland was prepared for Edinburgh Castle (1929). The description was by James S. Richardson, with an extended history (pp. 15–40) by Marguerite Wood.  It contains black and white photographs with a fouldout plan inside the back cover.

The second edition was published in 1939, and the third in 1948.

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1953 (4th ed.; 14th impress. 1973)

This guide continued as the Blue Guide. The plan was moved to the centre pages.

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1960

A souvenir guide was prepared for the Ministry of Works by the Central Office of Information in 1960. It has a subtitle, ‘An illustrated guide with the story of the castle through the centuries’. A small plan is placed on p. 3. At the end of the guide are sections on the Scottish United Services Museum; the Honours of Scotland; and the Scottish National War Memorial.

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1997

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2003 (repr. 2004)

The present Historic Scotland souvenir guide is by Chris Tabraham. It starts with a guided tour (Thirty steps to history), and then a history as ‘Symbol of Scotland’. There are ‘Did you know?’ boxes on each of the double page spreads. The guide also has the logo for the World Heritage Site.