Jobs for a green recovery – report from Green Alliance

The Green Alliance has just published a policy insight report setting out the data and arguments for investment in a range of nature-based investments which would bring about environmental improvement, assist climate change mitigation and deliver social and economic benefits, notably in job creation for areas of the country where there is a distinct labour market challenge.

The summary report and accompanying detailed analysis include focused case studies on some specific potential actions, such as habitat restoration for bogs and seagrass, and tree planting and park creation. These specific examples within a broader approach for green jobs help to build that compelling case, especially given the downstream wider potential skills development, higher level job creation, and broad long-term societal benefits.

The detailed report shows the impacts diagrammatically.

Diagram of potential economic impacts of natural environment enhancement

There isn’t a specific read-across to the historic environment within the report, but the links can be seen – from allied research and operations associated with understanding and managing the cultural landscape as nature-based investment is made, to shared skills enhancement and longer-term job creation which benefits both the natural and historic environment.

Figure 10 in the detailed report provides a breakdown of jobs in Scotland in nature-based activities and nature-dependent sectors in 2019 with 195,300 total jobs, noting that 2% of these are specifically related to museums and cultural activities, with a further proportions being travel/recreation and hospitality-related, and natural craft skills which are intimately tied to the heritage of localities.

Figure 10 jobs breakdown
Hirst, A. & Lazarus, H (2020) Supporting a Green Recovery: an initial assessment of nature based jobs and skills. NatureScot Research Report No. 1257

Academic journals: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space

Journal summary: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space was launched in 2018. It is an interdisciplinary journal of nature-society scholarship. International in scope, the journal considers theoretically robust, empirically rich research from an array of fields including political ecology, environmental justice, science and technology studies, conservation and the environmental humanities. The journal aims to push the ways we understand the uneven, dynamic, and often unjust intersections of nature and space with particular interest in their societal, political, and economic dimensions.

Publisher: Sage

Website: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/ene#

Access: Subscription; will publish some open-access articles

Journal type: Academic peer-reviewed

Academic journals: the Environment and Planning suite

Journal summary: Environment and Planning is a suite of 5 linked journals. First published in June 1969, the first issue of Environment and Planning was one of two issues that year. An immediate success, the journal quickly expanded, spawning a second series, Environment and Planning B in 1974 and adding Environment and Planning C and D in the 1980s. In 2018 Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space was launched.  Environment and Planning series contributes to the interdisciplinary study of space; the stuff of not only of human geography but today a matter of concern for a growing number of related social-science disciplines.

Each journal’s specific focus is as follows:

  • EPA: Economy & Space
  • EPB: Urban Analytics and City Science
  • EPC: Politics and Space
  • EPD: Society and Space
  • EPE: Nature and Space

Publisher: Sage

Website: https://www.eandponline.org/

Access: Subscription; some open-access articles

Journal type: Academic peer-reviewed