Lindisfarne Priory: brewhouse

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Lindisfarne Priory

The brewhouse at Lindisfarne Priory is located in the south range adjacent to the bakehouse. This part of the priory was constructed in the 1360s. The north-west corner contains a kiln.

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Lindisfarne Priory, brewhouse © David Gill

Warkworth Castle: wine cellar

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

The keep of Warkworth Castle in Northumberland contains two wine cellars on the ground floor of the east side of the building. The most southerly connected to the Great Hall above by a flight of stairs.

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

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Warkworth Castle, wine cellar © David Gill

 

Ringlet at Cherryburn

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Ringlet at Cherryburn, 2017 © David Gill

Today, 14 July 2017, marks the start of the Big Butterfly Count. Keep an eye out for butterflies when you are visiting heritage sites.

This ringlet was in the meadow behind NT Cherryburn in Northumberland, the birthplace of Thomas Bewick.

Vallum at Cawfields

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Vallum to the south of Cawfields © David Gill

A particularly fine stretch of the the vallum can be found running to the south of Hadrian’s Wall at Cawfields (MC42). The photograph shows the line of the flat-bottomed ditch with the two banks on either side.

Great Chesters: Roman altar

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Great Chesters © David Gill

The Roman fort of Great Chesters (Aesica) on Hadrian’s Wall lies entirely to the south of the wall. Remains of a milecastle were found underneath it (MC43).

Parts of the fort were excavated in 1894 and 1925. The 14th edition of the Handbook to the Roman Wall notes: ‘The overgrown remains of the south gate contain an uninscribed altar’.

This photograph taken in the early 1980s shows an altar, decorated with a jug, placed in the eastern guardroom of the southern gate. A letter (‘The Roman Wall: Examples of Vandalism’) to The Times (London) by Basil Barham of the East Herts Archaeological Society (27 August 1928) listed a series of complaints about activities along the line of Hadrian’s Wall including at Great Chesters: ‘At Aesica I notice a large portion of stone, apparently an altar, has been brought from some place and erected in the middle of a guard chamber, with a small piece of pillar stuck on its top.’ This staged display clearly lasted for over a century.

 

High Rochester: Mars and Hercules

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Inscription from High Rochester, Great North Museum © David Gill

The fort at High Rochester (Bremenium) in Northumberland was one of the most northerly outposts of the Roman Empire. The inscription, now in the Great North Museum, was discovered near to the east gate of the fort c. 1776 (RIB 1284). It was then displayed in Alnwick Castle.

The Latin text records work by a unit, vexillatio, of the 20th Legion Valeria Victrix. The inscription is flanked by figures of Mars and Hercules. Below appears to be a boar, the emblem of the legion.

A building inscription for a vexillatio of the 6th Legion Pia Fidelis is also known from the site (RIB 1283).

These two units may have been posted here, not necessarily simultaneously, to reinforce the northern frontier.

Chesters Roman Fort and Clayton Museum

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2016 (rev. 2nd ed.)

English Heritage has produced an updated version of its guidebook to Chesters Roman Fort on Hadrian’s Wall (for earlier guides see here). This and the earlier guide are by Nick Hodgson. The coverage has grown from 40 pages to 48 pages plus the material inside the covers. There are some changes to the illustrations.

The main new section is on the Clayton Museum with sections on the Antiquarian Display; The Collection; Coventina’s Well (see here); The Corvoran Modius.

The new guide, like the old, illustrates the so-called Crosby Garrett helmet and asserts the find-spot rather than inserting the phrase ‘said to be’ at the appropriate place.