Thetford Priory: Howard Tombs

IMG_1789John Howard, the First Duke of Norfolk, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 where he was commanding the part of Richard III’s army.

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Thetford Priory, likely tomb of John Howard © David Gill

His tomb appears to be located in a tomb constructed on the north side of the aisle of the church at Thetford Priory, and adjacent to the north transept. The body may have been moved to St Michael’s, Framlingham.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

The tomb of Thomas Howard (1443-1524), Second Duke of Norfolk, was placed at the east end of the original church (that had been extended). He defeated the army of James IV of Scotland at Flodden in September 1513.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

Howard died at Framlingham Castle in May 1524 and his body was buried at Thetford.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

 

Castle Acre Priory: chapter house

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Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

The chapter house at Castle Acre priory is located on the east side of the cloister, and backs onto the south transept of the priory church. It dates to the mid-12th century. The original form had an apse on the east side, now marked out adjacent to the infirmary passage. (The Ministry of Works marked the eastern apse of the chapter house at Thetford in the same way.)

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Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

The chapter house was remodelled in the early 14th century, and a wall blocked off the eastern apse. Traces of the seating for the monks can be seen on the north and south walls.

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Castle Acre Priory, chapter house © David Gill

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Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

Immediately to the south of the chapter house was the doorway that led to the dorter.

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Castle Acre Priory, chapter house © David Gill

Finchale Priory: dorter and reredorter

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

The dorter at Finchale Priory in Co. Durham is located on the east side of the cloister above the chapter house. It connected to the south transept of the church via a night stair. Sir Charles Peers suggested that the large room at the south end of the range ‘which in other monasteries served as a dayroom, is here too ill-lighted for such purpose, and at any rate in the later days of the priory can have been merely a storeroom’.

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

On the east side of the dorter was the reredorter.

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Finchale Priory © David Gill

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Finchale Priory, reredorter © David Gill

Warnings at Lindisfarne Priory

IMG_2149A number of the Ministry warning signs are still in evidence at Lindisfarne Priory. One is placed on the exterior wall of the west range facing the (modern) churchyard.

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A second is mounted in on one of the ovens in the south range. Similar signs are found at other locations, e.g. Thornton Abbey, Abbey at Bury St Edmunds, Kirkham Priory, Pickering Castle, Hadleigh Castle.

Thetford Priory Gatehouse

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Thetford Priory Gatehouse © David Gill

The priory at Thetford, Norfolk was founded in 1103, and moved to the present location in 1107. The 14th century gatehouse lies to the north-west of the priory (in the grounds of private houses). The property is in the care of English Heritage.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

 

Celebrating 100 Years of Guides to the National Heritage Collection

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1917

2017 marks the centenary of the first guidebooks to what can now be termed the National Heritage Collection. One of the first was written by Sir Charles Peers on St Botolph’s Priory in Colchester and now in the care of English Heritage. The guidebook was reissued as a ‘blue’ guide in 1964.

The 1917 guide include a fold-out plan of the priory inside the back cover. This was prepared by E. Dace Brown in July 1916. The guide was divided into three sections: The Augustinian Rule; History of St Botolph’s Priory; and The Priory Buildings.

Castle Acre: the prior’s lodging

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Prior’s lodging, and west end of priory church, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

The prior’s lodging lies in the northern part of the west range, adjacent to the priory church. The room identified as the prior’s study (or solar) on the first floor is part of a mid-14th extension to the structure.

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Prior’s study, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

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Prior’s solar, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

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Prior’s chapel, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

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Prior’s chapel, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

The prior’s chapel lay on the eastern side of the structure in a part of the building dating to the mid-12th century. Remaining parts of the earliest structure include the arch at the eastern end of the room, over the place where the altar was located. The east window, looking out towards the cloister, dates to c. 1300.

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Outer Parlour, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

On the ground floor, under the prior’s chapel was the outer parlour. This was accessed from outside via a north door, and to the cloister on the east side. The staircase led from here to the prior’s quarters.

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Undercroft, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

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Undercroft, Castle Acre Priory © David Gill

The vaulted undercroft lies under the prior’s solar.