Academic journals: International Journal of Architectural Heritage (Conservation, Analysis, Restoration)

Journal summary: IJAH provides a multidisciplinary scientific overview of existing resources and modern technologies useful for the study and repair of historical buildings and other structures. The journal will include information on history, methodology, materials, survey, inspection, non-destructive testing, analysis, diagnosis, remedial measures, and strengthening techniques.
Preservation of the architectural heritage is considered a fundamental issue in the life of modern societies. In addition to their historical interest, cultural heritage buildings are valuable because they contribute significantly to the economy by providing key attractions in a context where tourism and leisure are major industries in the 3rd millennium. The need of preserving historical constructions is thus not only a cultural requirement, but also an economical and developmental demand.
The study of historical buildings and other structures must be undertaken from an approach based on the use of modern technologies and science. The final aim must be to select and adequately manage the possible technical means needed to attain the required understanding of the morphology and the structural behavior of the construction and to characterize its repair needs. Modern requirements for an intervention include reversibility, unobtrusiveness, minimum repair, and respect of the original construction, as well as the obvious functional and structural requirements. Restoration operations complying with these principles require a scientific, multidisciplinary approach that comprehends historical understanding, modern non-destructive inspection techniques, and advanced experimental and computer methods of analysis.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/uarc20/current

Access: Subscription

Journal type: Peer-reviewed; some open-access

Academic journals: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) – Engineering History and Heritage

Journal Summary: Engineering History and Heritage publishes papers concerning existing infrastructure, buildings and civil engineering structures around the world, and issues related to their conservation, restoration and adaptation to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

Publisher: Institute of Civil Engineers (ICE) Publishing

Website: https://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/journal/jenhh

Access: Subscription; some open-access

Journal type: Academic and professional peer-reviewed

Heritage Scaffolding

IMG_7720

Signage at Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

The Governor’s House at Dumbarton Castle was in a state of restoration during a visit in 2015. But Historic Scotland had provided an information panel about the use of scaffolding over time.

IMG_7717

Entrance to King George’s Battery at Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

King George’s Battery was created in 1735.

Reconstructions at Rievaulx Abbey

IMG_9228_riev

Rievaulx Abbey © David Gill

Part of the arcade round the infirmary cloister at Rievaulx Abbey was reconstructed after it came under State Guardianship. The site was cleared under the direction of Sir Charles Peers in the 1920s, and some reconstructions made.

This sign on the reconstructed cloister arch was observed by William G.A. Ormsby-Gore [see his guidebooks], First Commissioner of Works, during a visit in December 1933; he made the note that it was ‘neat and unobtrusive’ and suggested further labels be applied around the site.

IMG_9229_riev

Rievaulx Abbey © David Gill

IMG_9231_Riev

Infirmary cloister, Rievaulx Abbey © David Gill

  • Anna Keay 2004. The presentation of guardianship sites, Transactions of the Ancient Monuments Society 48:7-20 [Abstract]
  • Sebastian Fry 2014. A History of the National Heritage Collection 4: 1913-1931. The Ancient Monuments Branch under Peers and Baines. Research Report Series 48-2014. English Heritage.

Sweetheart Abbey: Chapter House

IMG_0318_Sweeth

Sweetheart Abbey © David Gill

The chapter house at Sweetheart Abbey lies on the east side of the cloister adjacent to the library and sacristry. The benches around the outer edge of the chapter house remain in places.

The window that dominates the east wall appears to have been part of the refectory in the south range of buildings. It was then reused in the east wall of the parish church for New Abbey village that was built in 1731 along the south wall of the abbey nave. The window was placed in the chapter house in 1877 when the parish church was demolished.

The abbey was placed in State guardianship in 1928.

IMG_0316_Sweeth

Sweetheart Abbey, Chapter House © David Gill

Restoration at Kingarth

Kingarth

The Church of St Blane, Kingarth © David Gill

The church of St Blane’s at Kingarth lies at the southern end of the island of Bute. The site is now managed by Historic Scotland.

I was particularly interested in the contribution of Robert Weir Schultz. I had come across him as an architect at the British School at Athens. (Further bibliographical details can be found in Sifting the Soil of Greece.) Weir Schultz had a strong interest in Byzantine churches.

The connection with the 3rd Marquess of Bute is also significant.

Currently Reading: Theatres Magazine

The latest edition of the Theatres Trust magazine focuses on maintaining and modernising historic theatres. It includes a fascinating account of the construction of the historically accurate Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, which is the follow on stage from the reconstruction of Globe Theatre.

20140719-121416-44056598.jpg