Alight here for Sutton Hoo

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Melton Railway Station © David Gill

We are beginning to plot out our visitor journey for the Department for Transport funded project. Train passengers will travel from Liverpool Street (or Stratford) to Ipswich, then change to the Lowestoft line, alighting either at Melton or at Woodbridge.

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Woodbridge riverside and railway station © David Gill

From Melton there is a short walk over the river bridge and then up the hill to the site of Sutton Hoo. Woodbridge, opposite the burial mounds, provides access to the waterfront and other visitor facilities such as restaurants and shops.

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Stour Barge

Stour barge

Stour Barge at UCS © David Gill

One of the projects supported by the Heritage Futures team was the ‘Managing a Masterpiece‘ project on the Stour Valley. One of the projects was the reconstruction of the ‘John Constable’ Stour barge. This was first displayed at UCS before being transported to Sudbury.

A detailed report (‘The Stour Navigation Compendium’) can be found here.

Piercebridge Roman Bridge

Piercebridge

Piercebridge Roman Bridge © David Gill

The Roman road, Dere Street, from York (Eboracum) to Corbridge crossed the river Tees at Piercebridge. Remains of the Roman bridge are in the care of English Heritage (full details here including plan and bibliography). This bridge appears to date to the early 3rd century AD.

A short entry on on the bridge (with reconstruction) appears in the English Heritage guidebook to Aldborough Roman Town. 

Dumbarton Castle

Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

Dumbarton Castle has an impressive setting dominating the river Clyde. King George’s battery was named after King George II and dates to 1735 (noted on an inscription). The battery position was designed by Captain John Romer.

King George's Battery, Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

King George’s Battery, Dumbarton Castle © David Gill

The sentry box is similar to another of Romer’s design at Edinburgh Castle.

The Walls of Norwich

The Boom Towers on Carrow Bridge

The Boom Towers by Carrow Bridge (2015)

The tour of the medieval walls of Norwich was extremely instructive. We started at the Boom Towers adjacent to Carrow Bridge. These structures allowed a chain to be raised to restrict river traffic along the Wensum (although the position of the chain and winding mechanisms was not immediately clear). The damage to the tower since 1934 can be seen quite clearly here.

Tower on south side of Norwich (2015)

The Black Tower on south side of Norwich (2015)

We climbed up the hill from the river inspecting the well preserved walls and towers along the south side. For an image of the tower in the 1930s see here.

Detail of tower on south side of Norwich (2015)

Detail of the Black Tower on south side of Norwich (2015)

Notice the wall walk and the way that the staircase is mounted into the wall.

Terminal bastion (2015)

Terminal bastion or Oak Street Tower (2015)

We crossed the river to inspect this terminal bastion adjacent to the river in the northern part of the circuit.

Further details about the medieval walls of Norwich can be found here. A photographic record of the walls can be found here.