Dryburgh Abbey: choir

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Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

The choir rested below the central tower. To the east was the high altar, and to the south the night stair to the dorter. The north-east pier remains in the remains of the north transpet. IMG_2645-Edit-Edit

Dryburgh Abbey © David Gill

Cambuskenneth Abbey: guidebook

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1950 (repr. 1973)

Cambuskenneth Abbey, near Stirling, was founded in 1147.

The remains of the abbey were placed in State Guardianship in 1908. Stewart Cruden prepared the first guidebook in 1950; a second edition appeared in 1978. It consists of two parts: history and description. A plan is placed on the centre pages.

Arbroath Abbey: guidebook

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1954 (4th impress. 1972)

Arbroath Abbey was founded by William the Lion in 1178 in memory of Thomas Becket of Canterbury. Tironensian monks from Kelso helped to establish the community. The abbey was the setting for the Declaration of Arbroath on 5 April 1320.

The official guide is divided into two sections: a history by R.L. Mackie; and a description by Stewart Cruden. A conjectural reconstruction is placed in the centre, and a fold-out plan inside the back cover.

 

Augustinian Abbeys and Priories in State Care

South and South-East England

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The church of St Mary, Portchester © David Gill

Southwick Priory, Hampshire [EH]. The community dates to 1133 when it was established by Henry I at Portchester. The priory moved to its present site within the next two decades.

Bushmead Priory, Bedfordshire [EH]. Founded c. 1195.

East Anglia

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St Botolph’s Priory © David Gill

St Botolph’s Priory, Colchester, Essex [EH]. The Augustinian priory was founded c. 1100. It was probably one of the earliest foundations in England.

Waltham Abbey, Essex [EH]. The Augustinian priory was founded in 1177 and it later became an abbey.

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Creake Abbey, Norfolk © David Gill

Creake Abbey, Norfolk [EH]. The monastic site has its origins in 1206, although the Augustinian priory is later.

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St Olave’s Priory © David Gill

St Olave’s Priory, Norfolk [EH]. The priory was founded c. 1216.

Central England

Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire [EH]. The Augustinian abbey was founded in 1135.

Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire [EH]. Founded around 1148.

White Ladies Priory, Shropshire (Augustinian canonesses) [EH]. This seems to have been founded in 1186.

 

Wales

Llanthony Priory, Gwent [Cadw]. The priory was established c. 1118.

Penmon Priory, Anglesey [Cadw]. The monastic community became an Augustinian priory in the 13th century.

North-East and Yorkshire

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Gisborough Priory © David Gill

Gisborough Priory, Yorkshire [EH]. There are two foundation dates in 1119 and 1129.

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Kirkham Priory © David Gill

Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire [EH]. Founded by Walter l’Espec c. 1122, probably on the site of an earlier foundation.

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Brinkburn Priory © David Gill

Brinkburn Priory, Northumberland [EH]. Founded by William Bertran between 1130 and 1135.

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Thornton Abbey © David Gill

Thornton Abbey, Lincolnshire [EH]. Founded in 1140.

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Lanercost Priory © David Gill

Lanercost Priory, Cumbria [EH]. The traditional foundation date of the priory is 1169 in memory of Hubert de Vaux.

Scotland

Holyrood, Midlothian [HES]. The Augustinian abbey was founded by King David I in 1128.

Restenneth, Angus [HES]. The Augustinian priory was established  by King David I.

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St Andrews © David Gill

St Andrews, Fife [HES]. The Augustinian foundation dates to c. 1130.

Jedburgh, Roxburghshire [HES]. The Augustinian priory was founded here in 1138 by King David I. This became an abbey in 1154.

Cambuskenneth, Stirlingshire (Augustinian of Arrouaise) [HES]. Founded around 1140 by King David I.

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Inchmahome Priory © David Gill

Inchmahome Priory, Perthshire [HES]. The priory was founded c. 1238 by the Earl of Menteith.

 

 

Stirling Castle: guidebooks

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Second edition 1948, 7th impression 1967

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2nd ed. 1948 (8th impress. 1972)

The first edition of the guide to Stirling Castle was published in 1936: the description by J.S. Richardson, and the history by Margaret E. Root. A second edition appeared in 1948, and it continued as a ‘blue guide’ into the 1970s (note the move from guide-book to guide).

A fold-out plan was placed inside the back cover.

The cover of the Richardson and Root guide is ‘a drawing of a portrait medallion representing James V, one of a set of wood panels originally in the ceiling of the King’s Presence Chamber’. The heads were the subject of a monograph published by the Royal Commission in 1960. A booklet was issued by the Royal Commission in 1975, with the text by John G. Dunbar.

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1975

The Historic Scotland guide by Richard Fawcett was published in 1999. This consisted of a guide tour followed by the story (not history) of the castle.

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1999 (repr. 2002)

Huntingtower: guidebooks

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Huntingtower © David Gill

Huntingtower, near Perth, was placed in State Guardianship in 1912. James S. Richardson prepared the first guidebook in 1931. A second edition appeared in 1950 and continued in print into the 1970s. The blue guide uses a detail from the ceiling inside the castle. Richardson’s guide starts with historical notes (pp. 1–5), followed by a description (pp. 6–9). Black and white photographs, as well as floor plans appear in the centre of the guide. He comments:

Viewed from any point, Huntingtower presents a picturesque appearance; the broken line of walling, the corbelled parapets with their subdued corner rounds and the corbie-stepped gables give the visitor an impression of a Scottish fortified-house of the 16th century, divested of its outer defensive works, garden and orchard.

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1st ed. 1931; 2nd ed. 1950 (4th impress. 1972)

A third edition of Richardson’s guide was published in 1982. Historical notes have been replaced by history, and description by descriptive tour. Photographs and plans are incorporated in the text.

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1982, 3rd edition

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HMSO 1989 (Historic Scotland 1996, 2001)

Richardson’s guide was replaced in 1989 by a new guide by Denys Pringle. There are two main sections: the story of Huntingtower, and the architecture of Huntingtower. The centre pages provide a short tour of the castle. Floor plans are printed inside the back cover.

Glasgow Cathedral: guidebook

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1970

The cathedral church of St Kentigern is named after a 7th century saint. There is likely to have been a monastic site in the vicinity of the later cathedral. The cathedral itself was consecrated in 1197. It was rebuilt in the 13th and 14th centuries.

The guidebook was prepared by C.A. Ralegh Radford and contains a history (pp. 7–25) and a description (pp. 26–42). There is a foldout plan of the cathedral inside the back cover showing the layout of the altars. A series of black and white images appear in the centre of the guide.