Dundrennan Abbey: night-stairs and dorter

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

The site of the night stairs from the dorter at Dundrennan Abbey are located in the south transept.

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

The dorter was located above the chapter house, and remains of one of the windows can be seen in the upper section.

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

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Dundrennan Abbey © David Gill

The reredorter was located at the southern end of the range.

#HeritageDay17 Glenfinnan

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Glenfinnan © David Gill

The Glenfinnan Monument, in the care of the National Trust for Scotland, marks the point where Prince Charles Edward Stewart landed in 1745. The column was erected in 1815

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Glenfinnan © David Gill

Melrose Abbey: Dorter

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The dorter lay on the east side of the cloister, above the chapter house. The night stairs to it were in the north transept of the abbey church. The dorter was accessed through a round doorway.

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Melrose Abbey, doorway to dorter © David Gill

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Melrose Abbey, east range with doorway to night stairs © David Gill

The day stairs to the dorter lay in the north-east corner of the cloister, on the south side of the dorter. Note the roof line of the dorter on the exterior of the north transept of the church.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The reredorter lay on the east side of the dorter.

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Melrose Abbey © David Gill

The Antonine Wall: Legio XX

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Cast of inscription from Hutcheson Hill, now in Chesters Museum © David Gill

In 1865 a Latin inscription (RIB 2198) was recovered at Hutcheson Hill in the western section of the Antonine Wall. Casts were made and the original was taken to the Chicago Museum where it was destroyed in the great fire of October 1871. [See also Canmore]

The inscription records a vexillatio of the 20th Legion Valeria Victrix that had constructed 3000 feet of the wall.

Another inscription, now in the Hunterian Museum, was found in 1969 near Hutcheson Hill and similarly records a vexillatio of the same legion that had constructed 3000 feet of the wall (AE 1971, no.225) [JSTOR].

A third inscription of the Twentieth Legion probably comes from near Duntocher (RIB 2199).

vexillatio of the Sixth Legion Victrix Pia Fidelis was found at Duntocher (RIB 2200). This stretch was 3240 feet.

 

 

 

 

Thetford Priory: Howard Tombs

IMG_1789John Howard, the First Duke of Norfolk, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 where he was commanding the part of Richard III’s army.

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Thetford Priory, likely tomb of John Howard © David Gill

His tomb appears to be located in a tomb constructed on the north side of the aisle of the church at Thetford Priory, and adjacent to the north transept. The body may have been moved to St Michael’s, Framlingham.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

The tomb of Thomas Howard (1443-1524), Second Duke of Norfolk, was placed at the east end of the original church (that had been extended). He defeated the army of James IV of Scotland at Flodden in September 1513.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

Howard died at Framlingham Castle in May 1524 and his body was buried at Thetford.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

 

Crossraguel Abbey: private houses

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Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

A series of five houses are located in the south court of Crossraguel Abbey. They probably date to the 15th century.

The 1589 quotation is from John Vaus, who was appointed commendator (in the period following the Reformation). ‘Pur men’ are ‘poor men’.

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Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

St Martin’s Kirk, Haddington

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St Martin’s Kirk, Haddington © David Gill

St Martin’s Kirk is on the eastern edge of Haddington and dates to the 12th century. It is possible that the kirk was attended by the reformer John Knox who was born in the town.

The Kirk is in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

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St Martin’s Kirk, Haddington © David Gill