Binham Priory: church

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Binham Priory from the west © David Gill

The nave of the priory church at Binham remains in use.

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Binham Priory, nave © David Gill

Parts of the south aisle lie outside the present parish church.

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Binham Priory, south aisle and northern part of cloister © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

The choir and presbytery lie to the east of the present parish church and are now in a ruinous state.

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Binham Priory © David Gill

The north and south transepts are clearly marked.

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Binham Priory, south transept © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

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Binham Priory, night stairs in south transept © David Gill

The night stairs are located in the south transept. These led to the dorter.

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Binham Priory © David Gill

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Binham Priory © David Gill

The foundations of the late 11th century building are marked out in the north aisle.

The Lady Chapel may have been located on the north side.

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Binham Priory © David Gill

Helmsley Castle: signage

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Helmsley Castle © David Gill

One of the Ministry signs has been used at Helmsley Castle in Yorkshire. Variants of this include ‘Out of Bounds’ (Berwick upon Tweed), ‘No Access Beyond This Point’ (Dundrennan Abbey), ‘Private’ (Hadrian’s Wall; New Abbey Cornmill),  ‘No Admittance Without Ticket’ (Saxtead Green), and ‘No Admittance to Abbey This Way’ (Easby Abbey).

There was a ‘No Exit’ sign at Framlingham Castle.

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Helmsley Castle © David Gill

Cardoness Castle: notice signs

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

The top of Cardoness Castle provides views over the estuary. Visitors are discouraged from trying to get on top of the walls. One points out the danger, the other expressly forbids it.

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

The second reproduces the word ‘Notice’: surely redundant on a sign? And the clear indication that ‘visitors are not allowed on wall top’ is ‘by order’; underneath is an erased  line, ‘Ministry of Works’.

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Cardoness Castle © David Gill

Ministry signs on St Mary’s

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Porth Hellick Down © Patrick Taylor

The ancient monuments on St Mary’s on the Isles of Scilly received Ministry signs. The chambered tomb on Porth Hellick Down is described as ‘the best preserved tomb of all those in the islands’, echoing O’Neil’s guidebook, ‘perhaps the best preserved of all those in the islands’. Again, ‘a few potsherds have been found in the chamber’, follows, ‘a few potsherds have been found in this tomb’.

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Innisidgen © Patrick Taylor

At Innisidgen the sign starts with the same description as Porth Hellick. The description in the guidebook, ‘Nothing is known to have been found in the chamber’, follows the sign, ‘the chamber has long since been rifled of its contents’.

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Lower Innisidgen © Patrick Taylor

The sign at Lower Innisidgen echoes the others.

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Bants Carn © Patrick Taylor

The sign notes, ‘Cremated bones and pieces of pottery were found in the chamber many years ago’, whereas the guidebook states, ‘Four piles of cremated bones were found at the inner end of the chamber many years ago, as well as some pieces of pottery in the passage just outside the entrance to the chamber’.

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Bants Carn Ancient Village © Patrick Taylor

Near to Bants Carn Burial Chamber is a village. The sign and guidebook place it to the 2nd–3rd centuries AD, describing it as ‘Roman period’ or even ‘Romano-British’. The sign and guidebook talks of ’round or oval huts … built of large, well-laid granite blocks’. The guidebook continues ‘Paths and garden plots or small fields may also be detected’.

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Harry’s Walls © Patrick Taylor

A later monument is the artillery fort known as Harry’s Walls.

We are grateful to Patrick Taylor for digitising the images.