Thetford Priory: Howard Tombs

IMG_1789John Howard, the First Duke of Norfolk, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 where he was commanding the part of Richard III’s army.

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Thetford Priory, likely tomb of John Howard © David Gill

His tomb appears to be located in a tomb constructed on the north side of the aisle of the church at Thetford Priory, and adjacent to the north transept. The body may have been moved to St Michael’s, Framlingham.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

The tomb of Thomas Howard (1443-1524), Second Duke of Norfolk, was placed at the east end of the original church (that had been extended). He defeated the army of James IV of Scotland at Flodden in September 1513.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

Howard died at Framlingham Castle in May 1524 and his body was buried at Thetford.

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Thetford Priory © David Gill

 

The Tomb of Classicianus

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Tomb of Classicianus, British Museum © David Gill

Two parts of the inscription from this funerary monument of Classicianus were found reused in the bastion of the Roman wall just to the north of the Tower of London in 1852 and 1935 (RIB 12). The bolster from the top of the tomb was found in the same location. This suggests that the monument was erected on the eastern side of the Roman settlement. The Roman wall dates to the 3rd century AD.

G. Iulius Alpinus Classicianus is described as the procurator of the Roman province of Britannia. He was appointed in AD 61, as a successor to Catus Decianus, in the wake of the revolt by Boudicca (Tacitus Annals xiv.38). Classicianus seems to have originated in Gaul. It appears that he died in office.

The monument was erected by Classicianus’ wife Iulia Pacata, daughter of Indus. Julius Indus is noted as a key person who countered the revolt of the Treveri in AD 21 (Tacitus Annals iii.42).

A revised reconstruction of the tomb and reconstruction is presented by Grasby and Tomlin.

Bibliography
Hawkes, C. F. C. “The Sepulchral Monument of Julius Classicianus.” The British Museum Quarterly, vol. 10, no. 2, 1935, pp. 53–56., www.jstor.org/stable/4421794.
Grasby, R. D., and R. S. O. Tomlin. “The Sepulchral Monument of the Procurator C. Julius Classicianus.” Britannia, vol. 33, 2002, pp. 43–75., www.jstor.org/stable/1558852.

The 9th Legion in Lincoln

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Tombstone from Lincoln, British Museum © David Gill

One of the pieces of evidence for the 9th legion stationed in Lincoln comes from the funerary marker of Gaius Saufeius, son of Gaius (RIB 255). The absence of the cognomen should be noted. He died aged 40 and after 22 years of service. He came from Heraclea, in Macedonia.

The tombstone was found in 1865 at the corner of Salthouse Lane. John Parkinson sold it to the British Museum in 1873 (inv. 1873.05-21.1).

The 9th legion appears to have been replaced at Lincoln around AD 71, and then moved north to York.

Cavalryman from Corinium

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Tombstone of Sextus Valerius Genialis, Corinium Museum © David Gill

The Corinium Museum contains a particularly find Roman tombstone of a Roman cavalryman, eq(u)es, Sextus Valerius Genialis. It was discovered at Watermoor towards the south-east corner of the (later) Roman town of Cirencester.

The relief shows Genialis riding over a fallen soldier, and aiming his lance downwards. In his left hand he has a hexagonal shield as well as what appears to be a military standard.

The tombstone is dated to the late 1st century or early 2nd century AD.

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Tombstone of Sextus Valerius Genialis, Corinium Museum © David Gill

The inscription (RIB 109) reads:

Sectus Valerius Genialis, trooper (eq(u)es) of the Cavalry Regiment of the Thracians, a Frisiavone tribesman, from the troop (turma) of Genialis, aged 40, of 20 years’ service, lies buried here. His heir set this up.

Genialis came from Gallia Belgica. The unit is known to have been in Britain as late as 124, but then transferred to the Rhine.

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Tombstone of Sextus Valerius Genialis, Corinium Museum © David Gill

Lanercost Priory: tombs

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Lanercost Priory © David Gill

Some of the most important tombs at Lanercost are found in the eastern part of the priory church. This tomb in the north transept appears to date from the late 14th century and probably was for a member of the Dacre family. The sign suggests that more recent visitors to the site were in the habit of adding their initials or names to the monument.

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Tomb in north transepct, Lanercost Priory © David Gill

Lady Row’s tomb at Crossraguel

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Tomb cover of Lady Row at Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

A replica of the tomb cover of Egidia Blair, Lady Row is found in the nave of the abbey church at Crossraguel. She was buried here in 1530, according to her will ‘in the Blessed Virgin’s aisle’.

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Tomb of Lady Row now in the undercroft © David Gill

The original tomb cover is now on display in the east range undercroft.

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Tomb of Lady Row © David Gill

Crossraguel Abbey was placed in state guardianship in 1913.