Easby Abbey: warning signs

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Easby Abbey © David Gill

Modern visitors to Easby Abbey enter via the staircase into the west end of the refectory.

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Easy Abbey, east end of the refectory © David Gill

The thirteenth-century doorway to the dorter carries another warning sign.

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Easby Abbey, stairs to dorter © David Gill

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Easby Abbey © David Gill

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Easby Abbey © David Gill

A further warning sign is located near the chapter house on the east side of the cloister.

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Easby Abbey © David Gill

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Easby Abbey, chapter house © David Gill

Goldsborough Roman Signal Station

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Goldsborough Roman Signal Station looking south towards Whitby © David Gill

Goldsborough lies to the north of Whitby in Yorkshire. It was one of a series of Roman signal stations constructed along this piece of coastline.

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Goldsborough Roman Signal Station looking north © David Gill

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Goldsborough Roman Signal Station © David Gill

Other known signal stations lie at (from north to south): Huntcliff near Saltburn; Goldsborough; Ravenscar; Castle Hill at Scarborough; and Carr Naze at Filey.

There is an inscription from Ravenscar (RIB 721) that shows that the fort (turrem et castrum) was constructed by Vindicianus who is described as magister, a later rank. The overall commander was Justinianus. Anthony Birley dates the inscription to the 4th century.

Coins from Huntcliff suggest a date from c. 370 to c. 390.

John A. A. Goodall in his discussion of the signal station at Scarborough suggests two theories: a series of signal stations constructed in the wake of the ‘Barbarian Conspiracy’ of 367 (supported by William Hornsby through his excavations); or to the period of Magnus Maximus (383-388).

Bibliography

Bell, T.W. A Roman Signal Station at Whitby. Archaeological Journal 155 , 1 (1998), 303-22.

Hornsby, W., et al. The Roman Fort at Huntcliff, Near Saltburn. The Journal of Roman Studies 2 (1912), 215–32, www.jstor.org/stable/295958.

Hornsby, William, and John D. Laverick. The Roman Signal Station at Goldsborough, Near Whitby. Antiquaries Journal 89, 1 (1932), 203-19. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00665983.1932.10853589

Ottaway, Patrick, Richard Brickstock, John Carrott, H. E. M. Cool, Keith Dobney, Renée Gajowski, Sandra Garside-Neville, G. D. Gaunt, Allan Hall, Michael Issitt, Deborah Jaques, Frances Large & Jason Monaghan. Excavations on the Site of the Roman Signal Station At Carr Naze, Filey, 1993–94. Archaeological Journal 157, 1 (2000), 79-199.

Southern, P. Signals versus Illumination on Roman Frontiers. Britannia 21 (1990), 233–42, www.jstor.org/stable/526297.

Leading Visitor Attractions 2016: English Heritage

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Pendennis Castle © David Gill

The 2016 list of Leaving Visitor Attractions in the UK has been published. The top English Heritage site continues to be Stonehenge (at no. 23) with 1,381,855 visitors, with a modest 1.1 % increase on 2015 figures.

The remaining English Heritage properties are (with overall ranking):

  • Dover Castle (no. 98): 333,289
  • Osborne House (no. 116): 265,011
  • Tintagel Castle (no. 125): 229,809
  • Audley End House and Gardens (no. 149): 165,799
  • Whitby Abbey (no. 151): 151,810
  • Clifford’s Tower (no. 154): 146,703
  • Battle Abbey (no. 160): 137,771
  • Kenwood (no. 161): 134,416
  • Carisbrooke Castle (no. 164): 127,012
  • Wrest Park (no. 166): 124,305
  • Kenilworth Castle (no. 169): 107,993
  • Housesteads Roman Fort (no. 172): 102,004
  • Eltham Palace and Gardens (no. 176): 94,635
  • Bolsover Castle (no. 179): 91,880
  • Walmer Castle and Gardens (no. 180): 91,752
  • Pendennis Castle (no. 191): 73,907

The major increase in visitors were seen at Osborne House, Tintagel Castle, Audley End House and Gardens, Battle Abbey, Carisbrooke Castle, Wrest Park, Walmer Castle and Gardens. There was a significant downturn in visitors for Kenwood.

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Walmer Castle and Gardens © David Gill

The Infirmary at Rievaulx Abbey

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Rievaulx Abbey © David Gill

The infirmary at Rievaulx lies on the south [east] side of the complex, adjacent to the infirmary cloister. It consisted of a hall running east-west [north-south], with an arcade on the south [east] side of the wall where the columns can still be seen. Cuttings suggest that there were internal wooden partitions.

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Infirmary, Rievaulx Abbey © David Gill

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Infirmary, Rievaulx Abbey © David Gill

In the late 15th century, when John Burton was abbot, the infirmary was converted into the abbot’s house.

Byland Abbey: Rood Screen

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Byland Abbey © David Gill

The rood screen separated the lay brothers’ choir (at the west end of the abbey church) from the retrochoir. The nave altar stood at this point.

Note the square ends to the columns in the lay brothers’ choir.

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Byland Abbey, Lay Brothers’ Choir looking eastwards © David Gill

Byland Abbey: Dorter Above

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Byland Abbey © David Gill

The Monks’ Dorter at Byland Abbey is located at the south-east corner of the cloister, adjacent to the warming house, and to the south of the chapter house.

The monks’ dayroom was located on the ground floor, and the dorter was placed above. The dayroom was divided into seven bays.

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Byland Abbey, dayroom © David Gill

The dorter was reached via the day stairs from the cloister. These were located to the south of the chapter house.

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Byland Abbey, day stairs to dorter © David Gill

The monks could enter the abbey church though night stairs that entered the west side of the south transept.

Warming House at Byland

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Byland Abbey © David Gill

The warming house at Byland Abbey lies in the south-east corner of the south range of the cloister. It lies between the dayroom and the frater.

The space contained a massive fireplace where monks could find warmth. It probably dates to c. 1190.

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Byland Abbey © David Gill