Thetford Priory: Howard Tombs

IMG_1789John Howard, the First Duke of Norfolk, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 where he was commanding the part of Richard III’s army.

IMG_1790

Thetford Priory, likely tomb of John Howard © David Gill

His tomb appears to be located in a tomb constructed on the north side of the aisle of the church at Thetford Priory, and adjacent to the north transept. The body may have been moved to St Michael’s, Framlingham.

IMG_1798

Thetford Priory © David Gill

The tomb of Thomas Howard (1443-1524), Second Duke of Norfolk, was placed at the east end of the original church (that had been extended). He defeated the army of James IV of Scotland at Flodden in September 1513.

IMG_1799

Thetford Priory © David Gill

Howard died at Framlingham Castle in May 1524 and his body was buried at Thetford.

IMG_1801

Thetford Priory © David Gill

 

Lindisfarne Priory: steps to the dorter

IMG_2173

Lindisfarne Priory © David Gill

The night stairs that led from the dorter to the church are located in the south transept.

IMG_2172

Lindisfarne Priory © David Gill

The day stairs were at the south end of the dorter building. The chapter house was probably on the ground floor.

IMG_2206

Lindisfarne Priory © David Gill

IMG_2208

Lindisfarne Priory © David Gill

Crossraguel Abbey: private houses

IMG_7812

Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

A series of five houses are located in the south court of Crossraguel Abbey. They probably date to the 15th century.

The 1589 quotation is from John Vaus, who was appointed commendator (in the period following the Reformation). ‘Pur men’ are ‘poor men’.

IMG_7814

IMG_7807

Crossraguel Abbey © David Gill

Benedictine Abbeys in State Care

IMG_1257

Bury St Edmunds Abbey © David Gill

Battle Abbey, Sussex. The Abbey was founded on the site of William I’s victory at the battle of Hastings. It seems likely that it was founded at some point after 1070, and the choir of the new abbey was consecrated in 1076. The completed abbey was consecrated in February 1094. The first four monks came from the abbey of Marmoutier Abbey in the Loire. [EH]

Canterbury, St Augustine’s Abbey, Kent. The first abbey was established in 598 as part of Augustine’s mission to England. Abbot Scotland, a monk from Mont St Michel, was appointed in 1070. [EH]

Boxgrove Priory, West Sussex. Founded c. 1117 from abbey of Lessay in Normandy. [EH]

Westminster Abbey. The Pyx Chamber is in State Guardianship. [EH]

St_August_blue

1955 (12th impression 1977)

 

East Anglia

Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk. The monastery was the resting place of the body of king Edmund killed in 903. The Benedictine abbey was found in 1020. [EH]

Colchester, St John’s Abbey, Essex. The abbey was founded in 1095 to the south of the town. The 15th century gatehouse is in State Guardianship. [EH]

Isleham Priory, Cambridgeshire. The priory was founded c. 1100. The priory church is in State Guardianship. [EH]

Denny Abbey, Cambridgeshire. Founded in 1159, and passed to the Knights Templars in 1170. [EH]

Binham Priory, Norfolk. The priory was founded in 1091 from St Alban’s Abbey in Hertfordshire. [EH]

IMG_8593_Binham

Binham Priory, undercroft (with dorter above) and warming room beyond © David Gill

BSE_abbey_guide

The South-West

Muchelney Abbey, Somerset. [EH] [Historic England]

Abbotsbury Abbey, Dorset. The abbey was founded in 1044. [EH]

Wales

Ewenny Priory, Glamorgan. The Benedictine priory was founded by Maurice de Londres in 1141. It was founded from the abbey of St Peter in Gloucester that had links with the earlier church at Ewenny established 1116-26. [Cadw]

The North-East and Yorkshire

IMG_3091.JPG

Whitby Abbey © David Gill

Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire. The first monastery at Whitby was established by Abbess Hild in 657 at the prompting of king Oswy of Northumbria. The Synod of Whitby was held in 664. The monastery was probably destroyed during the Viking raids c. 867. In the years after the Norman conquest the monastery was established, probably c. 1078, by Reinfrid, from the Benedictine monastery of Evesham. The church was constructed c. 1090. [EH]

Jarrow Priory, Tyne and Wear. Founded from Durham between 1075-83. [EH]

IMG_2976

Finchale Priory © David Gill

Finchale Priory, Durham. The origins lie in the hermitage of St Godric that continued until 1196 when it became a priory linked to Durham Cathedral. [EH]

IMG_2139

Lindisfarne © David Gill

Lindisfarne Priory, Northumberland. The first monastery was founded in 635. It was destroyed by a Viking raid in 793. In 1069 St Cuthbert’s remains were brought to the island from Durham  to protect them during the Norman raids of the north. After 1083 Benedictine monks linked to Durham arrived at the older monastery site on Holy Island. The church was probably constructed from the 1120s. [EH]

sv_4_Newcastle_8271

Tynemouth Priory © David Gill

Tynemouth Priory, Tyne and Wear. The first monastery at Tynemouth was probably established in the late 8th century, part of the kingdom of Northumbria. It was important as the burial site of king Osred II of Northumbria. The monastery was probably destroyed in 875. A church on the site was destroyed during the early years of the Norman conquest, and the location given to the monks of Jarrow some time after 1074. A new church was built in 1083. Some after 1090 the monastery was given to the Benedictine abbey of St Albans in Hertfordshire by Robert de Mowbray, earl of Northumberland. [EH]

North-West

Wetheral Priory, Cumbria. founded in the early 12th century. [EH]

Scotland

Dunfermline Abbey, Fife. Founded c. 1070, perhaps as the earliest Benedictine community in Scotland. The abbey was established in 1128. [HES]

IMG_1786

Iona © David Gill

Iona Abbey. The Benedictine community was established in 1200. [HES]

 

 

St Martin’s Kirk, Haddington

IMG_2718

St Martin’s Kirk, Haddington © David Gill

St Martin’s Kirk is on the eastern edge of Haddington and dates to the 12th century. It is possible that the kirk was attended by the reformer John Knox who was born in the town.

The Kirk is in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

IMG_2720-Edit

St Martin’s Kirk, Haddington © David Gill

Bury St Edmunds: The Abbey Church

IMG_1217

Bury St Edmunds © David Gill

IMG_1216

Bury St Edmunds, North Transept © David Gill

The Abbey Church was 154 m long. In the North Transept was St Martin’s Chapel and the Lady Chapel.

IMG_1239

Bury St Edmunds, South Transept © David Gill

IMG_1238

Bury St Edmunds, South Transept © David Gill

In the South Transept was the Chapel of St Nicholas.

IMG_1218

Bury St Edmunds, Crossing © David Gill

IMG_1219

Bury St Edmunds © David Gill

The crossing stood below the central tower with the choir stalls immediately to the west at the head of the nave. The nave was constructed during the time of Abbot Anselm (1119-1148).

IMG_1243

Bury St Edmunds © David Gill

IMG_1242

Bury St Edmunds, Nave © David Gill

To the east of the crossing lay the high altar and beneath it the crypt.

IMG_1257

Bury St Edmunds Abbey, looking east towards North Transept and Crossing © David Gill

Hadleigh Castle: lead-melting hearth

IMG_6657

Hadleigh Castle © David Gill

The royal castle of Hadleigh was sold by Edward VI in 1551 to Baron Rich (Lord Lieutenant of Essex from 1552), and was soon dismantled. A lead-melting hearth was constructed on the floor of the former hall.

IMG_6656

Hadleigh Castle © David Gill